A project to catalogue more than sixty boxes of archival material related to the artist Naum Gabo.

  • Naum Gabo Jowett car Design model

    Naum Gabo
    Jowett car
    Design model

    Courtesy of Tate Archives
    © Nina Williams

When Naum Gabo left Russia in 1922, he did not know that he would never return. Like many of his contemporaries, circumstances forced him to move from his new home in Berlin to Paris, London and Cornwall, before finally settling in the United States. Nonetheless, he accumulated, and carried with him, an extraordinarily complete body of archive material, encompassing drawings, sketches, models, photographs, correspondence, diaries and writings from the First World War onwards.

Gabo’s personal papers are shared between the Tate Archive, the Beinecke Library at Yale University, and the Berlinische Galerie in Berlin, in accordance with the family’s wishes.

Supported by the Getty Foundation, Tate will catalogue more than sixty boxes of material held in the Tate Archive. Russian texts will be translated into English or summarised. Tate will host a new website devoted to the archive, including key images from Gabo’s archives held at Tate, Berlin and Yale, and a learning resource developed by the Tate Modern Learning team.

As well as providing greater insight into the artist’s life and work, Gabo’s archive raises questions about the role an archive plays in maintaining identity in uncertain circumstances. To mark the completion of the project and the beginning of academic exploitation of the archive, Tate hosted a one-day conference on the theme of emigré artists and their archives, with particular though not exclusive reference to Gabo, in November 2009.

Supported by The Getty Foundation

Project Information

Lead department(s): 
Support department(s): 
Project leader: 
Adrian Glew, Tate Archivist
Project team: 
Andrea Zierer, Gabo Project Archive Cataloguer, Tate Archive
Lyndsey Bracken, freelance Conservator
Madeleine Keep and Eleanor Clayton, Tate Britain Learning
Susan Sheddan, Tate Modern Learning
John Stack and James Davis, Tate Media