Joseph Mallord William Turner

Calder Bridge

1809

View this artwork by appointment, at Tate Britain's Prints and Drawings Rooms

Medium
Graphite on paper
Dimensions
Support: 116 x 185 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Reference
D07575
Turner Bequest CX 33

Catalogue entry

Turner passed through Calder Bridge on his way south from Whitehaven and Egremont, as described in the itinerary on folio 1 of this sketchbook (D07572). The small packhorse bridge across Friar Gill is a short walk along a footpath from Calder Abbey, for which see folio 31 (D07572), and had been built for the monks. Later, it was used to carry iron ore from Ennerdale to smithies in the fells for smelting. This careful inscribed drawing served as the basis for Calder Bridge, Cumberland (private collection)1 exhibited at Turner’s Gallery in 1810 and again in 1812. It found no purchaser there and remained on Turner’s hands until he sold it to Elhanan Bicknell probably in March 1844. As Butlin and Joll observe, the notes about wheelwrights must refer to the activities in the barn or similar building on the right of the picture.
1
Butlin and Joll 1984, pp.76–7 no.106 (pl.113).
Verso:
Blank

David Blayney Brown
August 2009

Read full Catalogue entry