Joseph Mallord William TurnerWindsor Castle c.1828

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Artwork details

Artist
Date c.1828
MediumWatercolour on paper
Dimensionssupport: 355 x 519 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Reference
D25156
Turner Bequest CCLXIII 34
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Catalogue entry

Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775–1851
Windsor Castle c.1828
D25156
Turner Bequest CCLXIII 34
Watercolour on white wove paper, 355 x 519 mm
Inscribed in red ink ‘34’ bottom right
Blind-stamped with Turner Bequest monogram towards bottom right
Stamped in black ‘CCLXIII – 34’ bottom right
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Eric Shanes has followed Finberg in identifying this colour study as relating to the watercolour Windsor Castle of about 1828 (British Museum, London),1 engraved in 1831 for the Picturesque Views in England and Wales (Tate impressions: T05086, T06093).2 The royal residence of Windsor Castle and its setting by the River Thames had long been a fruitful subject for Turner;3 the England and Wales view appears to have been informed particularly by slight drawings in the Windsor and St Anne’s Hill sketchbook of about 1827 (Tate D20559–D20561; Turner Bequest CCXXV 2, 2a, 3), possibly augmented by more detailed views from the north-west in the earlier Richmond Hill; Hastings to Margate sketchbook (Tate D10434; Turner Bequest CXL 13).
Shanes describes the present work as a ‘diaphanously’ painted ‘underlying colour structure’,4 but there are enough correlations in colour and form to make the identification likely. The relationship between trees in the middle distance and the castle beyond is different in each of the three Windsor and St Anne’s Hill sketches; in this colour beginning they are shown to the right of the distant buildings, whereas in the completed design they appear towards the left, in front of the castle, showing Turner’s exploration of the compositional permutations as well as the golden hazy atmosphere evoked here and developed in the finished watercolour as an early morning scene with the central sun over the skyline in the manner of Claude Lorrain (1604/5–1682), so admired and so often emulated by Turner.5
See also the introductions to the present subsection of identified subjects and the overall England and Wales ‘colour beginnings’ grouping to which this work has been assigned.
1
Andrew Wilton, J.M.W. Turner: His Life and Work, Fribourg 1979, p.397 no.829, reproduced.
2
Shanes 1997, pp.27, 95, 104.
3
See David Hill, Turner on the Thames: River Journeys in the Year 1805, New Haven and London 1993, pp.63–75.
4
Shanes 1997, p.27.
5
See Ian Warrell and others, Turner Inspired: In the Light of Claude, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery, London 2012.
Verso:
Blank (laid down and not examined).

Matthew Imms
March 2013

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