This CD includes contributions from a number of artists, including Anya Gallaccio, Cornelia Parker, Hew Locke and was published in 2004

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 2 – Intro

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 3 – Francesca Kaufmann

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 4 – Paola Pivi

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 5 – Jeffrey Ian Rosen

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 6 – Ursula Krinzinger

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 7 – Barbara Wien

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 8 – Cornelia Parker

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 9 – Hew Locke

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 10 – Josephine Pryde

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 11 – Anya Gallaccio

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 12 – Stephen Snoddy

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 13 – Roman Signer

Audio Arts: Volume 22 No 1, Track 14 – Isaac Julien

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  • Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 1

    Inlay for Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 1, published in 2004
    Archive reference: TGA200414/7/3

    © William Furlong

  • Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 2

    Inlay for Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 2, published in 2004
    Archive reference: TGA200414/7/3

    © William Furlong

  • Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 3

    Inlay for Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 3, published in 2004
    Archive reference: TGA200414/7/3

    © William Furlong

  • Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 4

    Inlay for Audio Arts Volume 22 No 1, Inlay 4, published in 2004
    Archive reference: TGA200414/7/3

    © William Furlong

Candice Breitz: Re-Animations

Candice Breitz’s conversation revolves around her exhibition Re-Animations at Modern Art Oxford. She discusses her ‘unpicking’ of the fabric of MTV culture. The stereotypical habits of channel hopping, soap addicts, the consumer of Hollywood films or pop video’s are referenced in her discussion of her installation pieces Diorama 2002, Soliloquy Trilogy 2000, Double Karen 1970/2000, Double Olivia 1977/2000 and Becoming 2003. The conversation begins with Diorama and Breitz’s understanding of the global language of soaps. She discusses her deployment of Dallas with its ‘roots in Greek tragedy’ the condensing of her ‘family of characters’ grabbed from thirteen years of cliff hangers – and the clichés of family life and family tree. When discussing Double Karen Breitz talks about the way that love songs consist of the ‘I’ and ‘Me’ words and her decision to use Karen Carpenter’s and Olivia Newton John’s songs: ‘I subjected myself to a huge number of sentimental love songs or pseudo love songs and reduced them to their basic components’. Finally she talks about Soliloquy Trilogy and Becoming and the way that she has reduced the former Hollywood stars to only their dialogue – and in the latter where she herself is a doppelganger stripped of props, assuming the position and character of her Hollywood ‘heroine’, an ironic and iconic act ‘I took Basic Instinct and stalked her (Sharon Stone) out of the movie, very aggressively cutting out all parts where she was silent – removing everything in between… I couldn’t get it without moving my mouth in the same way – this breaks down the original and the copy’.

Interview by Jean Wainwright, November 2003

Please note: this track has not been cleared for use online

Frieze Art Fair – London

Including: Francesca Kaufmann (Galleria Francesca Kaufmann); Paula Pivi, Untitled (Slope); Jeffrey Ian Rosen (Taka lshii Gallery); Ursula Krinzinger (Galerie Krinzinger); Barbara Wien (Galerie Barbara Wien); Cornelia Parker (Frith Street Gallery); Hew Locke (Hales Gallery); Josephine Pryde (Galerie Christian Nagel); Anya Gallaccio (Blum & Poe Gallery); Stephen Snoddy (Milton Keynes Gallery).

Interviews by Jean Wainwright, October 2003

Roman Signer

Roman Signer was interviewed in St Gallen on the occasion of the Sammlung Hauser and Wirth’s major Summer 2003 exhibition of his work (1971–2003). In these extracts, Signer addresses the question of continuity and development in his practice – the persistence of certain core problems, and the crucial importance of film as a working tool. He discusses the function of explosions as a means of revealing temporal qualities and the critical functions of chance and failure. He considers the issue of his physical presence in the production of his event sculptures and restates his aim of broadening the category of sculpture itself. The Sammlung Hauser and Wirth’s chief curator Dr Michaela Unterdoerfer translates.

Interview by Rachel Withers, 2003

Isaac Julien

Isaac Julien – whose previous films include Looking for Langston (1989), The Long Road to Mazatlan (1999) and Vagabondia (2000) – discusses Paradise Omeros and Baltimore 2003, his two film installations at the Victoria Miro Gallery in London as well as his related photographic works. The conversation addresses ‘loss and recovery – loss and re-composition’ in relationship to ‘creoleness’ and language. He addresses his visual references to London in the 1960s and St Lucia today and the narrative influences of Derek Walcott’s epic poem Omeros which phrased the African diaspora in Homeric terms. Julien wants to provoke ‘identification’ with the work and for spectators to have ‘an experiencal relationship to the material’. He talks of the ‘contamination’ of the different visual strategies in his films and bringing them together in the ‘language of cinema’. Julien questions cultural difference which he sees at the heart of Paradise Omeros, its hybridity and the politics of representation. Julien also discusses Baltimore 2003, his three-screen installation, which uses the Walters Art Museum, the Contemporary Museum and the Great Blacks in Wax Museum as its key locations and themes. Reference is made to Melvin Van Peebles and Blaxploitation films the ‘contamination of high art and popular culture… to create a new language’. Julien is concerned to ‘construct a space for what is absent’ the question of memory being very important for his practice. Stating that he wants to think about his work as ‘performing acts which are linked to cultural expression’, his ‘intentionality is to create a space for empathy’.

Interview by Jean Wainwright, Victoria Miro Gallery, London October 2003