Curators Elsa Coustou and Flavia Frigeri share their bite-sized highlights from The EY Exhibition: World Goes Pop

Dorothée Selz

‘What kind of woman shall I become? Which woman would I like to resemble? Which woman am I?’ asks Dorothée Selz with this playful series of collages and staged photographs. Selz duplicates images of pin-ups and calendar girls, imitating their seductive poses. Through doing this she questions how the mass media conveys feminity and sexual attraction. The brightly coloured frames, made from edible icing, emphasise the presentation of the female body as something to be consumed.

Dorothée Selz, Relative Mimetism, 'The Vargas Girl' Woman After Vargas, 1973 / 2
Dorothée Selz

Mimétisme Relatif - Femme "The Vargas Girl" d'après Aslan, 1973.

Gelatin silver print and mortar on wood

300 x 360 mm
Dorothée Selz, Relative Mimetism, 'The Vargas Girl' Woman After Vargas, 1973
Dorothée Selz

Mimétisme Relatif - Femme "The Vargas Girl" d'après Aslan, 1973

Gelatin silver print and mortar on wood

300 x 360 mm

Uwe Lausen 

This free-standing beheaded pilot is unusual both within the pop art genre and Lausen’s career as a painter. Applying comic-strip aesthetics, bright colours and delineated contours onto a sculpture, he creates a hybrid work combining pop with a traditional medium. The horrors of World War II surface in many of Lausen’s works: here the headless pilot seems to be illuminated, as if looking towards a sunset, or an explosion.

Uwe Lausen, Pilot, 1966
Uwe Lausen

Pilot, 1966

Plaster, painted

1600 x 600 x 450 mm

Glauco Rodrigues

The Song of Solomon, a lyrical text from the Bible celebrating erotic love, has traditionally been read as a religious allegory. This work proposes a different allegory of sexuality, alluding to Brazil’s economic relationship with the USA. The sensually posed woman is a modern version of Sandro Botticelli’s Venus rising from the sea on a scallop shell: Rodrigues’ goddess reclines on the Shell Corporation logo and is to be looked at through 3D glasses. By combining the logo and sexualised image Rodrigues can be seen to mock Brazilian culture for being prone to exploitation.

Glauco Rodrigues, The Song of Solomon - Concha Shell, 1967
Glauco Rodrigues

The Song of Solomon - Concha Shell, 1967

Ink self-propelled on acrylic and 3D glasses

1190 x 1300 x 130 mm

Raimo Reinikainen

Replacing the American flag’s stars with newspaper photographs of the Vietnam War, and its stripes with a rainbow of colours; Reinikainen’s works were intended as a condemnation of the United States’ role in the conflict. ‘I was appalled at how the richest country on the planet was trying to ravage one of the world’s poorest countries’ he has commented. ‘These four paintings were my protest against the war.’

Raimo Reinikainen, Sketch 1
Raimo Reinikainen

Sketch 1 for the U.S. Flag, 1966

Oil on canvas, collage

360 x 650 mm
Raimo Reinikainen, Sketch 4
Raimo Reinikainen

Sketch 4 for the U.S. Flag, 1966

Oil on canvas

400 x 650 mm

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Comments

Very useful blog with engaging concepts and ideas. Written in an engaging manner.