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  • Tate Etc. issue 29 (Autumn 2013)

    Tate Etc. issue 29 (Autumn 2013)

  • Tate Etc. issue 29 (Autumn 2013) - Margaret Harrison

    Tate Etc. issue 29 – Margaret Harrison

  • Tate Etc. issue 29 (Autumn 2013) - Art Turning Left

    Tate Etc. issue 29 – Art Turning Left

  • Tate Etc. issue 29 (Autumn 2013) - Art Under Attack

    Tate Etc. issue 29 – Art Under Attack

  • Tate Etc. issue 29 (Autumn 2013) - Aquatopia

    Tate Etc. issue 29 - Aquatopia

Editors’ note

Artist voices have always been at the heart of Tate Etc. magazine’s editorial content, and this issue is no exception. To celebrate the comprehensive rehang of the national collection of British art at Tate Britain, as well as the architects Caruso St John’s ancipated transformation of the oldest part of the Grade II Millbank building, we invited 24 artists from across the world to write about a work of British art from the past 500 years currently on display at Tate Britain that has inspired or influenced them.

We purposefully cast a wide net to show how extensive and far-reaching is the cultural exchange among contemporary artists, as our contributors from countries including Ethiopia, Turkey, China, Brazil, India, Japan and Nigeria reveal. And many of their choices reflect their deeply felt connections with their fellow artists.

The Cuban Carmen Herrera has long admired how ‘only that which is necessary remains’ in Ben Nicholson’s paintings (which she first saw in 1949). Both Iranian Shirana Shahbazi and American Raphael Montanez Ortiz are mesmerised by J.M.W. Turner’s Colour Trials sketches, the abstract nature of which has similarly been appreciated by Chinese artist Liu Xiaodong. For some, the Tate works have acted as triggers for personal memories. Takesada Matsutani relates his experience of the 1995 earthquake in Kobe, Japan, to John Martin’s The Great Day of His Wrath 1851–3, while Alexander Apóstol takes Christopher Wood’s surreal painting of a zebra set against the backdrop of a concrete building (Zebra and Parachute 1930) to reflect on the suggestive power of the ‘tropical modernity’ of his Venezuelan urban upbringing to change the way he now looks at the world.

You will also find this wonderfully rich mix of voices in our iPad app that contains extra filmed interviews with artists, photography slideshows and much more – all of which is free to download for all Tate Members. We hope you enjoy both

Bice Curiger and Simon Grant

In this issue

Essay

Etc Essay: Art as Therapy
Alain de Botton

We often have high expectations when we visit a museum of having great experiences with the art we see, but are we approaching it in the wrong way? And do museums give us the right information to guide us on our journey? Writer and philosopher Alain de Botton argues that the therapeutic nature of art can ‘rebalance our characters, recover calm, rediscover hope, expand our capacities for empathy and help us to learn to appreciate the everyday’. Taking four works in Tate Britain’s rehang as a starting point, he shows us how art can ‘reawaken us to the genuine merit of life as we are forced to lead it’

Etc. Essay: Art at the crossroads
Florian Illies

The author of the celebrated book 1913: The Year Before the Storm chooses two works from the Tate collection that reflect the cultural contrasts and complexities of the twelve months leading up to the outbreak of the Great War

Tate Etc. online exclusive

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Liadin Cooke

To celebrate the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited 24 celebrated artists from around the world to write about a work by a British artist from the past 500 years that is currently on display. Here, Liadin Cooke discusses David Des Granges’s The Saltonstall Family c.1636–7

Mira Schendel at Tate Modern
Fernanda Gomes

On the eve of the first international survey of her work, fellow Brazilian artist Fernanda Gomes pays tribute to Mira Schendel

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Haroon Mirza

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Haroon Mirza discusses Rose Wylie’s Arab and Dancing Girl 2006

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Frank Bowling

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Frank Bowling discusses John Constable and the British tradition of landscape painting

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Nicholas Hlobo

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Nicholas Hlobo discusses David Hockney’s A Bigger Splash 1967

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Kishio Suga

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Japanese artist Kishio Suga discusses Tony Cragg’s Stack 1975

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Otobong Nkanga

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, African artist Otobong Nkanga discusses Anya Gallaccio’s preserve ‘beauty’ 1991–2003

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Aida Muluneh

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, photographer Aida Muluneh reflects on Steve McQueen’s Bear 1993

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Sandra Gamarra

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Peruvian artist Sandra Gamarra discusses John Simpson’s Head of a Man

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Ed Atkins

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, contemporary artist Ed Atkins reflects on George Frederic Watts’s The Minotaur

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Susan Hiller

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, conceptual artist Susan Hiller reflects on Portrait of a Lady and the artist Angelica Kauffmann

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Hassan Khan

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, artist, musician and writer Hassan Khan discusses his relationship with William Blake and The Ghost of a Flea 

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Marvin Gaye Chetwynd

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Marvin Gaye (formerly Spartacus) Chetwynd discusses George Stubbs

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Nil Yalter

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Nil Yalter reflects on William Hogarth’s O the Roast Beef of Old England (‘The Gate of Calais’) 1784

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Takesada Matsutani

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Japanese mixed-media artist Takesada Matsutani reflects on John Martin’s The Great Day of His Wrath 1851–3

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Alexander Apóstol

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, artist Alexander Apóstol, inspired by Christopher Wood, discusses his ‘tropical modernity’

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Carmen Herrera

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Carmen Herrera reflects on Ben Nicholson

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Sterling Ruby

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, contemporary artist Sterling Ruby reflects on Sarah Lucas

Zarina Hashmi

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Zarina Hashmi discusses Richard Long

Tate Etc. at Tate Britain / Artists' Perspectives
Shirana Shahbazi
Raphael Montañez Ortíz

In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, artists Shirana Shahbazi and Raphael Montanez Ortiz discuss J.M.W. Turner’s Colour Trials sketches

Feature

The EY Exhibition – Paul Klee: Making Visible at Tate Modern
Nicholas Fox-Weber

The diverse works of one of the most inventive and best-loved artists of the twentieth century, often done in series, are being brought together for the first large-scale Paul Klee exhibition in the UK for more than ten years. At the heart of his practice were the ideas and energies that emerged during his teaching at the Bauhaus, alongside fellow artists Josef and Anni Albers, as a friend of theirs recounts

Painting Now: Five Contemporary Artists at Tate Britain
Andrew Wilson

What does it mean to be a painter today? Five artists who work with paint in varying ways and for different ends give us a glimpse into new possibilities for the medium

Private view: William Rothenstein
Chris Shaw

British photographer Chris Shaw delves into a dark, enigmatic painting in Tate’s collection – William Rothenstein’s The Doll’s House 1899–1900. It is a work that reminds him of his time as a hotel night porter, about which he has made a celebrated series that will be included in a display of his images at Tate Britain

Aquatopia: The Imaginary of the Ocean Deep at Tate St Ives
James Attlee

Ninety per cent of the world’s oceans remain unexplored, fuelling our fascination for and fear of the sea for centuries, even as we have discovered more of its contents. Artists and writers have explored its complex hold on the human psyche, and Aquatopia takes us on a trans-historical voyage of the oceanic imaginary through the eyes of a fabulously diverse range of artists, including J.M.W. Turner, Odilon Redon, Hokusai, William Wyllie, John Bellany, The Otolith Group and Steven Claydon

Art Under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm at Tate Britain
Jonathan Griffin

Smashed stained glass windows, defaced religious statues, ashed portraits slashed with knives, sculptures blown up, watercolours defaced, art objects doused in acid, destroyed with axes, defaced, or burned. As an exhibition at Tate Britain reveals, iconoclasm has taken many turns throughout the centuries in the United Kingdom, from savage destruction during the Reformation to more recent actions by contemporary artists

Art Turning Left at Tate Liverpool
Hari Kunzru

When Jacques-Louis David allowed his famous painting The Death of Marat 1793–4 to be used in support of the Republican cause in France, he changed the meaning and power of the image forever. Since then artists’ left-wing political values have variously influenced the making of art and visual culture, from William Morris’s emphasis on hand-production values to the anonymously designed Atelier Populaire posters of 1968. To coincide with Tate Liverpool’s ground-breaking exhibition Art Turning Left: How Values Changed Making – the first to explore the impact of the Left on the production and reception of art from the French Revolution to the present day – writer Hari Kunzru charts the rich mix of artist voices and ideas across the centuries

Harry Callahan at Tate Modern
Shoair Mavlian

Despite being regarded as one of the most influential figures in post-war photography, Harry Callahan’s work is little known in the UK. The recent acquisition of 90 images encompassing the wide range of his practice highlights the career of one of America’s photographic pioneers

Recent Acquisition: Margaret Harrison
Margaret Harrison

The pioneering feminist artist talks to Tate Etc.’s Mariko Finch about her 1977 piece Homeworkers, a politically potent work exploring the plight of non-unionised women in the 1970s doing manufacturing work at home, which is now on show at Tate Modern