In celebration of the reopening of Tate Britain, Tate Etc. invited a selection of artists from around the world to choose a favoured work from a fellow artist currently on display. Here, Japanese artist Kishio Suga discusses Tony Cragg’s Stack 1975

As I often work with wood, particularly natural wood without much processing, my eyes are inevitably drawn to art using the same material. It seems to me that there are few foreign artists who simply use natural wood, an exception being Giuseppe Penone, in whose work I can see infinite natural scenery in the background. My practice has a similar aspect.

However, I encountered a plain wood sculpture at a museum in Japan that did not give any sense of the natural environment. It was a pillow-like object carved by Tony Cragg that seemed to have been stuck between the vertical wall and horizontal floor. I was impressed and became deeply interested in his practice of processing wood in an original way, responding to certain situations.

In Stack, different materials, such as wood, concrete, paper, metal and plastic, are piled up neatly in a two-metre cube. It has its own shape but keeps the nature of each component. Making one thing while maintaining the reality of many others is to create a new world of diversity that has never existed before.

Kishio Suga (born 1944) lives and works in Ito-shi, Japan. His piece Ren-Shiki-Tai 1973 was purchased with funds provided by the Asia Pacific Acuiquisitions Committee 2010 and is on display at Tate Modern.