I joined the artmaps team shortly after the first engagement event, and was brought in to design a usable interface with the developers up in Nottingham. We wanted to create a platform that required little explanation or instruction for a user to spend as little or as much time as they liked with.

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  • Art Maps designing the interface world map view
  • Art Maps designing the interface
  • Art Maps designing the interface
  • Art Maps designing the interface

I was tasked with creating the web only version as an Art Maps app is to be developed in parallel and will focus more on the out-and-about experience. The desktop version is more for reflecting and browsing and has recently launched into the gallery at Tate Britain in the foyer of the exhibition Looking at the View at Tate Britain and will hopefully be rolled out for mass public use in the near future.

Art Maps designing the interface

The bulk of the design was spent working out how to make the Art Map accessible to a user that may either want to simply browse a map of the Tate collection or go a little deeper and make suggestions on locations and comment on artworks. To do this I settled with the idea of the map spreading across almost the whole screen which would maximise the area that the user would see on approach. This was immediately quite a visual treat and made the whole design process much simpler as I tried just to simplify everything else so the map stayed as the focal point.

Art Maps designing the interface

The buttons and type were all increased in size to make them stand out and allow a very visible journey to the artwork page where the user would be able to comment and suggest alternative locations for the artworks.

Art Maps in gallery display

Now that Artmaps is launched in the gallery, we get to start on making it work for everyday use on your computer at home and hopefully develop the functionality to improve the experience.