Kristen Kreider and James O’Leary are a poet and architect who collaborate as Kreider + O’Leary to make performance, installation and time-based media work in relation to sites of architectural and cultural interest. For the upcoming Late at Tate Britain: Performing Architecture live event they have been digging through the building’s physical and historical layers to develop a special guided tour. Here’s a snippet of what’s in store on Friday 1 February.

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  • Kreider + O’Leary, A statue with blind eyeballs, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    Kreider + O’Leary, A statue with blind eyeballs, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    © Kristen Kreider + James O’Leary

  • Kreider + O’Leary, Behind this sleek new symbol, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    Kreider + O’Leary, Behind this sleek new symbol, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    © Kristen Kreider + James O’Leary

  • Kreider + O’Leary, Now merged inadequate in light of stars, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    Kreider + O’Leary, Now merged inadequate in light of stars, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    © Kristen Kreider + James O’Leary

  • Light Vessel Automatic, Tate 2013

    Kreider + O’Leary, Light Vessel Automatic, Text-Image Composite, 2012

    © Kristen Kreider + James O’Leary

Their video titled The Measure of Now gives a hint of what’s to come in their experiential tour Light Vessel Automatic at Late at Tate. 

Kreider + O’Leary, The Measure of Now, Video Excerpt, 2012
© Kristen Kreider + James O’Leary

Architect and installation artist James O’Leary explains:

The video is composed of scanned images taken from a number of bibliographic sources relating to the site at Millbank, charting the development of the area through various methods of representation, from early engraved printing methods to more contemporary documentary photographic practice.

At Late at Tate Kreider + O’Leary will present a guided tour ‘en-promenade’ to explore specific details of the fabric of the Tate Britain building. With archaeological levels of detail, they’ll use images, video and architectural elements to explore the site as the fulcrum for a number of inter-related systems: from the spatial and historical to the social or artistic. 

Find out more about the transformations happening at Tate Britain for The Millbank Project.