The sun. Artists have long since been fascinated by the sun and sun light. Just take a look at the work of Turner and Monet.

Joseph Mallord William Turner, 'War. The Exile and the Rock Limpet' exhibited 1842

Joseph Mallord William Turner
War. The Exile and the Rock Limpet exhibited 1842
Oil on canvas
support: 794 x 794 mm frame: 1175 x 1172 x 150 mm
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856

View the main page for this artwork

But over and above its aesthetic lure is the fact that the sun is part of an equation that equals life on earth (as we know it).  No sunlight, no photosynthesis; no photosynthesis, no vegetation; no vegetation, no food for us (or any other critter that eats veg) and no plant life would also mean no pollinators. I could go on. 

Sunset seekers a part of our Liverpool Landscape: From Turner to Today sets out to find the best vantages points for experiencing sunsets.  Everton Park, with its elevated, west facing terrain, offers sensational views across the Mersey estuary. On a fine evening, from the right vantage point, you can watch the sun drop down and disappear beyond the coastal horizon; brandishing the sky with streaks of pinks, oranges, and reds as it goes.

But where in the park might these vantage points be? We, the sunset seekers, set out to find them with stepladders (for an elevated viewing position), a compass (to help us find due west), a chiffon scarf (for wind direction and magnitude), sunglasses (to protect our eyes), umbrellas (a very useful accessory), deckchairs (for well earned rests), and our sunset views evaluation sheets.

Me and Andrew with our essential sunset seeking equipment

Me and Andrew with our essential sunset seeking equipment

© Kerry Morrison

Quite absurd under the circumstances as the sun was no-where to be seen.

Everton Park was shrouded in mizzle. Grey Stratus nebulosus clouds blanketing Birkenhead. Visibility poor. Luckily, we were clad in magnificent shades of orange: highlighted figures on a dank day attracting attention and conversation; guided from one sunset spot to next by ever welcome local knowledge.

We chatted to thirty people, some of whom we felt a great affinity with.

Little sunset seekers

Little sunset seekers

© Kerry Morrison

We assessed seven potential sites. 

Assessing the best sites for sunset viewing v2

Assessing the best sites for sunset viewing

© Kerry Morrison

Settling on our final choice to watch the sun go down – or would have, had the sun been visible.  Instead of seeing the glowing orb drop we witnessed the changing light of the sky, the sun illusive behind veils of Cirrus fibrates clouds arranged into bands by the wind.

Sunset over Everton Park from our best vantage point

Sunset over Everton Park from our best vantage point

© Kerry Morrison

We were not alone. Twenty-five other people ventured into Everton Park that evening – all to see the stunning sunset effects.   

5 of the best spots identified by me and Andrew for sunset viewing in Everton park

5 of the best spots identified by me and Andrew for sunset viewing in Everton park

© Kerry Morrison

Everton park is a must if you ever want to see a stunnng sunset, but, for the best dramatic effects choose a day with some sun.  

Sunset seekers quest to be continued…

Kerry Morrison is an environment artist commissioned by Tate Liverpool to contribute to Our Liverpool Landscape: From Turner to Today is a series of outdoor events inspired by Tate Liverpool’s summer exhibition, Turner Monet Twombly

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