Imagine if 22,000 billboards across the country displayed art instead of adverts - and you got to choose it! Well, Art Everywhere is just that. Welcome to the world’s largest art show

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  • John William Waterhouse, 'The Lady of Shalott' 1888

    John William Waterhouse
    The Lady of Shalott 1888
    Oil on canvas
    support: 1530 x 2000 mm frame: 2000 x 2460 x 230 mm
    Presented by Sir Henry Tate 1894

    View the main page for this artwork

  • Sir John Everett Millais, Bt, 'Ophelia' 1851-2

    Sir John Everett Millais, Bt
    Ophelia 1851-2
    Oil on canvas
    support: 762 x 1118 mm frame: 1105 x 1458 x 145 mm
    Presented by Sir Henry Tate 1894

    View the main page for this artwork

  • Francis Bacon, Head VI, 1949, Arts Council Collection. On loan to Manchester Art Gallery

    Francis Bacon, Head VI, 1949, Arts Council Collection. On loan to Manchester Art Gallery

    © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS 2013

  • John Singer Sargent (RA), Gassed, 1919, Imperial War Museum.

    John Singer Sargent (RA), Gassed, 1919, Imperial War Museum. On display at Imperial War Museum, London

  • Lucian Freud, Man’s Head (Self Portrait I), 1963, Whitworth Art Gallery.

    Lucian Freud, Man’s Head (Self Portrait I), 1963, Whitworth Art Gallery. On display

    © The Lucian Freud Archive

  • Joseph Mallord William Turner, The Fighting Temeraire, 1839, The National Gallery.

    Joseph Mallord William Turner, The Fighting Temeraire, 1839, The National Gallery. On display

    © The National Gallery, London

  • Alfred Wallis, Five Ships, Mount’s Bay, c.1928, Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge.

    Alfred Wallis, Five Ships, Mount’s Bay, c.1928, Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge. See by appointment

    © Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge

  • L.S. Lowry, Going to the Match, 1953, Professional Footballers’ Association.

    L.S. Lowry, Going to the Match, 1953, Professional Footballers’ Association. On loan to Tate Britain

    © The Estate of L.S. Lowry. All rights reserved, DACS 2013

  • James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 'Nocturne: Blue and Gold - Old Battersea Bridge' circa 1872-5

    James Abbott McNeill Whistler
    Nocturne: Blue and Gold - Old Battersea Bridge circa 1872-5
    Oil on canvas
    support: 683 x 512 mm frame: 922 x 760 x 83 mm
    Presented by the Art Fund 1905

    View the main page for this artwork

  • Cornelia Parker, 'Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View' 1991

    Cornelia Parker
    Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991
    Mixed media
    unconfirmed: 4000 x 5000 x 5000 mm
    Presented by the Patrons of New Art (Special Purchase Fund) through the Tate Gallery Foundation 1995 Cornelia Parker

    View the main page for this artwork

For two weeks this summer, the UK is going to be turned into the world’s biggest art gallery. From a long list of artworks held in UK public collections, you were asked to cast your vote for the works you want to see on billboards and bus stops across the UK, kicking off next Monday 12 August.

Spearheaded by Richard Reed, (co-founder of Innocent Drinks) in collaboration with the Art Fund, Tate, the poster industry, and 101 creative agency, the aim of Art Everywhere was to ‘flood our streets with art’.

With over 30,000 Facebook likes and over a thousand donations (to cover paper and print costs) from around the world, you’ve helped to create the world’s largest art show. Now the votes are in, we can reveal your favourite artwork is…The Lady of Shalott by John William Waterhouse, (now on display at Tate Britain). This much-loved work is followed by another Pre-Raphaelite painting, Ophelia by John Everett Millais.

Pre-Raphaelite paintings may have nabbed the first two spots, but the top 10 cuts across varied moments in British art from Francis Bacon’s Head VI, to Lowry’s Going to the Match and the sculptural installation, Cold Dark Matter, by Cornelia Parker, previously on display at Tate Modern.

Each physical poster will be interactive using image-recognition - so when you’re next waiting for the bus, just point your phone at the art to access instant information, visit the collection online and share your favourites. Or, of course, you can go via good old social media - share with us on our Google+, Facebook pages and Twitter via @Tate #ArtEverywhere.

Art Everywhere: The Public’s Choice

1. John William Waterhouse, The Lady of Shalott, 1888, Tate

2. Sir John Everett Millais, Ophelia, 1851-2, Tate

3. Francis Bacon, Head V1, 1949, Arts Council Collection

4. John Singer Sargent, Gassed, 1919, Imperial War Museum

5. Lucian Freud, Man’s Head (Self Portrait I), 1963, Whitworth Art Gallery

6. JMW Turner, The Fighting Temeraire, 1839, The National Gallery

7. Alfred Wallis, Five Ships, Mount’s Bay c 1928, Kettle’s Yard,Cambridge

8. L. S. Lowry, Going to the Match, 1953, Professional Footballers’ Association

9. James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Nocturne: Blue and Gold – Old Battersea Bridge, c.1872-5, Tate

10. Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View, 1991, Tate

Art Everywhere takes place on billboards across the UK from 12 - 25 August 2013