The Camera at Work series explores historical, sociological and aesthetic issues related to the photographic representation of work. It coincides with Tate Modern’s major exhibition Cruel and Tender.

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About

In the second of the The Camera at Work series, radical social historian Theodore Zeldin reflected on the ways many photographs in Tate Modern’s major exhibition Cruel and Tender: the Real in the Twentieth Century Photograph could be seen to comment on work-related issues such as self-esteem, pay, discrimination and social recognition. Theodore Zeldin is a fellow and former dean of St. Anthony’s College, Oxford and is now President of the Oxford Muse. His innovative books, including An Intimate History of Humanity, Happiness, The French and Conversation, offer a provocative perspective on human history and relationships focusing on the evolution of feelings and personal relationships. In his present research project on the Future of Work he is investigating a wide range of occupations to see how they could become less narrow and frustrating. The Camera at Work series explores historical, sociological and aesthetic issues related to the photographic representation of work. It coincides with Tate Modern’s major exhibition Cruel and Tender. A collaboration with The Work Foundation, in association with Prospect magazine.