Richard Hamilton and Sarat Maharaj discussed the legacy of Marcel Duchamp’s work, through ideas of translation. The event was chaired by Mignon Nixon.

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Double takes, colliding oppositions, persuading images – these are some of the words Richard Hamilton and Sarat Maharaj used to talk about Hamilton’s continued interest in the work of Marcel Duchamp. In the catalogue to Hamilton’s 1992 exhibition at Tate, Maharaj quotes him as saying ‘all branches put out by Duchamp have borne fruit, yet no individual may claim to be his heir. He can have no progeny because his wisdom has led ultimately to neutrality’. Richard Hamilton and Sarat Maharaj (Professor of Art History and Theory at Goldsmith’s College) discussed the legacy of Marcel Duchamp’s work, through ideas of translation. The event was chaired by Mignon Nixon, lecturer in the History of American Art at the Courtauld Institute, and editor of the October publication, The Duchamp Effect. In association with Wimbledon School of Art.