Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium – Part 1: Introduction

Day 1: Introduction

Video coverage of past conference at Tate Modern: Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium

Stuart Comer, Tate Modern and Griselda Pollock CentreCATH

Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium – Part 2: The Art Historical Encounter

Day 1: The Art Historical Encounter

Video coverage of past conference at Tate Modern: Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium

Bill Wilson

Since the late 1960s, when Eva Hesse’s art began to have significant impact, it has challenged artists, art historians and curators. To mark the major exhibition, Eva Hesse, at Tate Modern, a conference was organised in collaboration with AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, Leeds (CentreCATH) in Leeds.

Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium – Part 3: The Art Historical Encounter

Day 1: The Art Historical Encounter

Video coverage of past conference at Tate Modern: Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium

Naomi Spector

Since the late 1960s, when Eva Hesse’s art began to have significant impact, it has challenged artists, art historians and curators. To mark the major exhibition, Eva Hesse, at Tate Modern, a conference was organised in collaboration with AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, Leeds (CentreCATH) in Leeds.

Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium – Part 4: Discussion 1

Discussion 1

Video coverage of past conference at Tate Modern: Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium

Dicussion 1: Naomi Spector, Bill Wilson chaired by Griselda Pollock

Since the late 1960s, when Eva Hesse’s art began to have significant impact, it has challenged artists, art historians and curators. To mark the major exhibition, Eva Hesse, at Tate Modern, a conference was organised in collaboration with AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, Leeds (CentreCATH) in Leeds.

Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium – Part 5:Eva Hesse: Re-reading [Art] History

Day 1: Eva Hesse: Re-reading [Art] History

Video coverage of past conference at Tate Modern: Encountering Eva Hesse Symposium

Elisabeth Sussman

Since the late 1960s, when Eva Hesse’s art began to have significant impact, it has challenged artists, art historians and curators. To mark the major exhibition, Eva Hesse, at Tate Modern, a conference was organised in collaboration with AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, Leeds (CentreCATH) in Leeds.

To mark the major exhibition, Eva Hesse, at Tate Modern, a conference was organised in collaboration with AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, Leeds (CentreCATH) in Leeds.

Since the late 1960s, when Eva Hesse’s art began to have significant impact, it has challenged artists, art historians and curators. It continues to provoke serious critical and historical analysis, with reference to feminism, formalism and post-minimalism. In the opening week of a major exhibition of her drawings, gouaches, paintings and sculptures, this conference takes as its theme ‘the encounter’. It addresses how art historians have framed Eva Hesse’s work through current interpretative strategies and understandings of gender, ethnicity, trauma and difference; how artists encounter her art in its material and making process; and how they relate their understanding of her historical practice to their own work or contemporary art in general. How do curators frame our encounter with Eva Hesse now as museum visitor, and what differences result from changing curatorial strategies?

This transdisciplinary conference was convened by Griselda Pollock and Vanessa Corby, from the AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory and History, Leeds (CentreCATH) in collaboration with Tate Modern.