Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 1: Sophie Howarth

Introduction by Sophie Howarth

Matisse Picasso at Tate Modern brings together major masterpieces by the two giants of modern art. Between them Matisse and Picasso originated many of the most significant developments of twentieth-century painting and sculpture. Now you can discover more about their fascinating and intricate relationship in this long-awaited exhibition which opens at Tate Modern and subsequently travels to Paris and New York. 

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 2: Andrew Brighton

Session 1: Matisse, Picasso and Marketing the Modern
Speaker: Andrew Brighton, Senior Curator: Public Events, Tate Modern

The rise of the reputations and prices of Matisse and Picasso were made possible by the development of new ways of marketing art. In his talk, Andrew Brighton asks to what extent the character of their work formed by the political economy of their reputations.

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 3: Sarah Wilson

Session 2: Matisse, Picasso and Exhibition Making
Speaker: Sarah Wilson, Lecturer in Art History at the Courtauld Institute of Art

In the light of two very different exhibitions – the Royal Academy’s Paris: Capital of the Arts 1900–1968 (26 January –19 April 2002) and Tate Modern’s Matisse Picasso (11 May – 18 August 2002), Sarah Wilson, curator of the former, discusses the relationship between exhibition history and the fictional recreation of artists’ personae and influence.

Further Reading

Constantin Brancusi: The Essence of Things, Tate 2004, especially Alexandra Parigoris, ‘The Road to Damascus’

Alex Potts, The Sculptural Imagination: Figurative, Modernist, Minimalist, Yale 2000, specially ‘Sculpture as Object: Brancusi’.

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 4: Niru Ratnam

Session 3: A Fascination with ‘Otherness’
Speaker: Niru Ratnam, Lecturer in Art History at The Open University

Both Picasso and Matisse drew upon African art early on in their careers, arguably in order to break, or continue in their break from, conventional western visual languages. Niru Ratnam examines the idea of the cultural ‘other’, how it has been constructed and how it persists in contemporary art.

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 5: Discussion 1

Discussion 1

Video coverage of past conference at Tate Modern: Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories; Part 5

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 6: Mike Belshaw

Session 4: Matisse and Picasso: Painting the Studio
Speaker: Mike Belshaw, Doncaster College

Mike Belshaw focuses on Matisse and Picasso’s studios, specifically their paintings of studios. He discusses the effects of paintings within paintings in such works and the extent to which the spectator’s view can also be the artist’s.

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 7: Chris Riding

Session 5: Matisse’s Music
Speaker: Chris Riding, artist and Lecturer in Art History at the University of Keele

Chris Riding considers focus Matisse’s paintings The Music Lesson 1917 and The Piano Lesson 1916 in relation to the formalist theories of Roger Fry and Clement Greenberg.

Further Reading

G.Perry ‘The expanding field: Ana Mendieta’s Silueta Series’ in J. Gaiger, ed, Frameworks for Modern Art, Yale UP/OU, 2004.

J. Blocker, Where is Ana Mendieta, Duke University Press, 1999.

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 8: Gill Perry

Session 6: Gender, Matisse and the Fauves
Speaker: Gill Perry, Senior Lecturer in Art History at The Open University

Gill Perry explores the relationship between the work of Matisse and the Fauve avant-garde, and that of several women artists working and exhibiting on the fringes of the movement. She focuses on issues of spectatorship and ideas of avant-gardism, and goes on to consider the role of gender in both contemporary and modern perceptions of Fauve practice.

Matisse Picasso, Creating And Destroying Histories – Part 9: Discussion 2

Discussion 2

Matisse Picasso at Tate Modern brings together major masterpieces by the two giants of modern art. Between them Matisse and Picasso originated many of the most significant developments of twentieth-century painting and sculpture. Now you can discover more about their fascinating and intricate relationship in this long-awaited exhibition which opens at Tate Modern and subsequently travels to Paris and New York.

The rise of the reputations and prices of Matisse and Picasso were made possible by the development of new ways of marketing art. In his talk, Andrew Brighton asks to what extent the character of their work formed by the political economy of their reputations.

Session 1

Matisse, Picasso and Marketing the Modern

Speaker: Andrew Brighton, Senior Curator: Public Events, Tate Modern The rise of the reputations and prices of Matisse and Picasso were made possible by the development of new ways of marketing art. In his talk, Andrew Brighton asks to what extent the character of their work formed by the political economy of their reputations.

Session 2

Matisse, Picasso and Exhibition Making

Speaker: Sarah Wilson, Lecturer in Art History at the Courtauld Institute of Art In the light of two very different exhibitions – the Royal Academy’s Paris: Capital of the Arts 1900–1968 (26 January –19 April 2002) and Tate Modern’s Matisse Picasso (11 May – 18 August 2002), Sarah Wilson, curator of the former, discusses the relationship between exhibition history and the fictional recreation of artists’ personae and influence.

Session 3

A Fascination with ‘Otherness’

Speaker: Niru Ratnam, Lecturer in Art History at The Open University Both Picasso and Matisse drew upon African art early on in their careers, arguably in order to break, or continue in their break from, conventional western visual languages. Niru Ratnam examines the idea of the cultural ‘other’, how it has been constructed and how it persists in contemporary art.

Session 4

Matisse and Picasso: Painting the Studio

Speaker: Mike Belshaw, Doncaster College Mike Belshaw focuses on Matisse and Picasso’s studios, specifically their paintings of studios. He discusses the effects of paintings within paintings in such works and the extent to which the spectator’s view can also be the artist’s.

Session 5

Matisse’s Music

Speaker: Chris Riding, artist and Lecturer in Art History at the University of Keele. Chris Riding considers focus Matisse’s paintings The Music Lesson 1917 and The Piano Lesson 1916 in relation to the formalist theories of Roger Fry and Clement Greenberg.

Session 6

Gender, Matisse and the Fauves

Speaker: Gill Perry, Senior Lecturer in Art History at The Open University Gill Perry explores the relationship between the work of Matisse and the Fauve avant-garde, and that of several women artists working and exhibiting on the fringes of the movement. She focuses on issues of spectatorship and ideas of avant-gardism, and goes on to consider the role of gender in both contemporary and modern perceptions of Fauve practice.