Mira Schendel Graphic Object 1967 Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros © The estate of Mira Schendel
Mira Schendel Graphic Object

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 10, Introduction

Introduction to the second day of the Mira Schendel conference: Tanya Barson

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 11, Sofia Gotti

Sofia Gotti’s contribution to the Mira Schendel conference

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 12, Kiki Mazzucchelli

Kiki Mazzucchelli’s contribution to the Mira Schendel conference

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 13, Aline Rezende

Aline Rezende’s contribution to the Mira Schendel conference

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 14, Discussion 3

Mira Schendel conference: Discussion 3; Kiki Mazzucchelli, Aline Rezende, Sofia Gotti. Chaired by Dr Michael Asbury

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 15, Jasia Reichardt

Jasia Reichardt’s contribution to the Mira Schendel conference

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 16, Guy Brett

Guy Brett’s contribution to the Mira Schendel conference.

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 17, Discussion 4

Mira Schendel conference: Discussion 4: Guy Brett, Jasia Reichardt. Chaired by Dr Isobel Whitelegg

Mira Schendel conference – Day 2: Part 18, closing remarks by Tanya Bryson

Mira Schendel conference: closing remarks by Tanya Barson

Mira Schendel (1919–1988) was one of Brazil’s most important yet complex and enigmatic artists. While her most well-known works are delicate monotypes, her work encompassed painting, drawing, collage, sculptural objects, notebooks and installations.This conference will address the complex relationship of Schendel’s thought to her visual production, focusing on the connections between her painterly practice, her graphic and sculptural works and her dialogues with a diverse range of philosophers, thinkers, artists and critics. It will explore her engagement with themes of being/existence, faith, time and the philosophy of language. The individual papers will examine the impact of Schendel’s early studies in philosophy in Italy and how her ongoing engagement with Continental and Eastern thought impacted on her development of a radical art practice.