This is the series of video recordings from the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation

Pervasive Animation – Part 2: Pervasive Animation, Ethics and Spatial Politics with Suzanne Buchan

This is the video recording of  Pervasive Animation, Ethics and Spatial Politics with Suzanne Buchan from day 2 of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation

Especially since the digital shift, the manipulated moving image has been the focus of heated debates around representation, truth values and ethics. This talk considers the pervasiveness of animation across a wide band of platforms and explores how it can evoke empathy and emotion. Through a sample of Edouard Salier’s, thought-provoking, bombastic Flesh (2005) it homes in on how these can contribute to engendering ethical awareness and ultimately responsibility in animation’s makers, distributors and audiences.

Suzanne Buchan is Reader in Animation Studies and Director of the Animation Research Centre at the University College for the Creative Arts. A founding member and 1995-2003 Co-Director of the Fantoche Animation Festival in Switzerland, she has been described as a curator of, commentator on, and activist for imaginative animation internationally. Founding Editor of animation: an interdisciplinary journal, her publications and curatorships include Trickraum: Spacetricks that accompanied the eponymous exhibition at the Zurich Museum of Design currently on tour, and an edited anthology, Animated ‘Worlds’. Forthcoming publications include a monograph on the Quay Brothers and an AFI Reader on Animation Studies.

Pervasive Animation – Part 3: The Line and the Ani-morph, or Travel is more than just A to B with Vivian Sobchack

This is the video recording of The Line and the Ani-morph, or ‘Travel is more than just A to B with Vivian Sobchack from day 2 of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation

One of the elements that separates live-action, photo-real cinema from animation is the line, a conceptual meta-object that has no existence other than as an idea or a graphic. There are no lines in photo-real cinema. Using five television advertisements for Hilton Hotels made by German animator Raimund Krumme, this presentation will address some of the paradoxes inherent in the single animated graphic line as both an abstract geometric construct and the eccentric visualisation of energy and entropy.

Vivian Sobchack is Professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Digital Media and former Associate Dean at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television. She was the first woman elected president of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies and is on the Board of Directors of the American Film Institute. She has published essays in many journals including Film Quarterly, Artforum International, and camera obscura, and her books include An Introduction to Film; The Address Of The Eye: A Phenomenology Of Film Experience; Screening Space: The American Science Fiction Film; and, most recently, Carnal Thoughts: Embodiment And Moving Image Culture. She has also edited two anthologies: The Persistence Of History: Cinema, Television And The Modern Event and Meta-Morphing: Visual Transformation And The Culture Of Quick Change.

Pervasive Animation – Part 4: Pervasive Animation, Discussion 1

This is the video recording of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation, the second day discussion 1

This conference facilitates much-needed dialogue centred on the ubiquitous and interdisciplinary nature of animation, its potentially radical future development, and its ethical responsibilities for spatial politics in moving image culture

Pervasive Animation – Part 5: Session Introduction

This is the video recording of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation from the second day and is a session introduction

This conference facilitates much-needed dialogue centred on the ubiquitous and interdisciplinary nature of animation, its potentially radical future development, and its ethical responsibilities for spatial politics in moving image culture.

Pervasive Animation – Part 6: George Griffin ‘Concrete Animation’

This is the video recording of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation from the second day and features George Griffin ‘Concrete Animation’

A discussion of the perennial tendency to deconstruct the web of animated illusion by focusing on its constituent parts, processes, and materiality. From Émile Cohl and Winsor McCay to flipbook artist/wanderer Volker Gerling, whose work is ‘animated’ by the viewer, and Gregory Barsamian, whose phased kinetic sculptures are ‘animated’ by strobe light, we are entering a realm of devolution. Griffin will also discuss how his anti-cartoon works, Step Print and Block Print, fit within the continuum.

George Griffin grew up in Tennessee, served in the Army, and studied political science at Dartmouth, before arriving at New York City in 1967, where he apprenticed in commercial animation studios. Influenced by Robert Breer and Saul Steinberg, he has made over 20 films, from self-referential cartoons, abstract experiments with music, to gallery installations and flipbooks. Griffin has written essays and books on animation; served on international animation festival juries; received a Guggenheim Fellowship; and also taught at Harvard, Parsons, and Pratt. In 2006 he completed a 10 minute cartoon, It Pains Me to Say This and produced an animated documentary celebrating the centennial of the MacDowell Colony.

Pervasive Animation – Part 7: Anthony McCall 'Then and Now'

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features Anthony McCall ‘Then and Now’

A discussion about what has changed in McCall’s own practice between the Seventies and the present. This will include reflections on traditional film animation and digital animation, on expanded cinema and art installation; and on differences between the early group of films and the most recent works.

Anthony McCall’s films and installations from the 1970s, such as Line Describing a Cone, Long Film for Four Projectors, and Four Projected Movements, represent a corporeal and sensuous meditation on the medium of film and the politics of the audience’s physical and conceptual relationship to it. Using rudimentary animation techniques, these works take as their starting point a simple line drawing, the illusion of movement, and the irreducible, necessary conditions of cinema: projected light, and real, three-dimensional space. Beginning with Doubling Back in 2003, McCall returned to the solid light form. Since then, with works like Breath, Exchange, and Between You and I, Then and Now, he has developed a group of important new installations which radically expand on the earlier series and continue to merge the field of the ‘real’ with the event of projection itself. McCall’s work has been presented recently at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin; IAC Institut d’Art Contemporain, Villeurbanne, France; Peer Gallery and the Round Chapel, London; Kunsthaus Zürich; and ZKM / Museum für Neue Kunst, Karlsruhe. His work is represented in collections internationally, including Tate, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museu d’Art Contemporain de Barcelona; and Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt.

Pervasive Animation – Part 8: Discussion 2

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features a discussion

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features a second discussion from the day

Pervasive Animation – Part 9: Tom Gunning ‘The Soul of Things: Animating the Inanimate in the Uncanny and Fantastic’

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features Tom Gunning ‘The Soul of Things: Animating the Inanimate in the Uncanny and Fantastic’

Cinema, Jean Epstein claimed, revealed the soul within the seemingly inanimate world. The uncanny—Freud and Jentsch claimed—had some relation to the way objects might seem to be alive. The traditions of object animation in film from early cinema to the avant-garde continues a tradition that stretches from the theurgy of antiquity to the modern dreams of artificial life. This talk will explore this theme and its implications.

Tom Gunning is Edwin A. and Betty L. Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of the Humanities at The University of Chicago in the Department of Art History and the Committee on Cinema and Media. He is author of two books, D. W. Griffith and the Origins of America Narrative Film (University of Illinois Press) and The Films of Fritz Lang; Allegories of Vision and Modernity (British Film Institute), as well as over a hundred articles on early cinema, the avant-garde, film genres, and issues in film theory and history. His publications have appeared in a dozen languages. He is currently writing on the theory and history of motion in cinema.

Pervasive Animation – Part 10: Siegfried Zielinski ‘Dead Bodies & Living Machines’

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features Siegfried Zielinski ‘Dead Bodies & Living Machines’

Animated film is historically a product of industrialisation. It was an unbloody alternative to traditional anatomy, taking bodies apart, putting them together again and making them move (in an illusionary manner, of course). Zielinski will discuss animation within the framework of a broader genealogy of machines of the living / living machines.

Siegfried Zielinski is Founding Director of the Academy of Arts & the Media Cologne and holds the chair for Theory – Archaeology & Variantology of Media at Berlin University of the Arts. At the European Graduate School Saas Fee he holds the Michel Foucault professorship. He has published numerous books and essays in many different languages, mainly with a focus on the archaeology/variantology of the media.

His most recent books in English are: Deep Time of the Media (MIT Press 2006), which also has been published in Chinese, German and Portugese, and Variantology 2 (Koenig, 2006). Zielinski is member of the Academy of Arts Berlin, the European Film Academy and the Magic Lantern Society of Great Britain.

Pervasive Animation – Part 11: Discussion 3

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features a discussion

This conference facilitates much-needed dialogue centred on the ubiquitous and interdisciplinary nature of animation, its potentially radical future development, and its ethical responsibilities for spatial politics in moving image culture.

Pervasive Animation – Part 12: Edwin Carels ‘Borderline Behaviour – Drawn towards Animation’

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features Edwin Carels ‘Borderline Behaviour – Drawn towards Animation’

Ever since animation pioneer Émile Cohl made his debut, many artists have been hard to situate in the interval between live action and animation, between animation and the visual arts, between animation and graphic design. This talk presents some notes on an expanded notion of animation as a state of mind, a strategic approach to both technology and to the imaginary.

Edwin Carels (1964) is the head of the film and media department of the MuHKA (Museum of Contemporary Art in Antwerp, Belgium). He is also the programmer of the Exploding Cinema section for the International Film Festival of Rotterdam, The Netherlands. As a curator and as a writer, he explores cinema, media archeology and contemporary art.

Pervasive Animation – Part 13: Johnny Hardstaff ‘The Impossibly Real: Green Belting the Imaginary’

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features Johnny Hardstaff ‘The Impossibly Real: Green Belting the Imaginary’

Before we have explored what CGI technology can really do, it seems that CGI technology is exploring what we can do. Animation is being used within corporate advertising to render the visual obsolete as a medium for the conveyance of messages of emotional or intellectual value. Discuss.

Johnny Hardstaff is an unusual hybrid, working both as a designer and director, and as an animator and academic. Hardstaff works very much on the fringes of the creative industries, and increasingly beyond in the pursuit of radical and progressive non-commercial applications of design. Maverick and revisionist, Hardstaff, through his practice, research and development, writing and teaching, seeks to challenge accepted commercial design models and develop different opportunities for personal graphic expression. A graduate of St. Martins School of Art, Hardstaff has directed films for Radiohead, Orange, PlayStation and the BBC amongst others. His work has been screened and exhibited at major London galleries and venues including Tate Modern, the ICA and the NFT, in venues across Eastern and Western Europe, and as far afield as Hong Kong, Japan and Korea, where his first retrospective was recently held.

Pervasive Animation – Part 14: Discussion 4

This is the video recording from day two of the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation and features a discussion

This conference facilitates much-needed dialogue centred on the ubiquitous and interdisciplinary nature of animation, its potentially radical future development, and its ethical responsibilities for spatial politics in moving image culture.

This is the series of video recordings from the Tate Modern conference Pervasive Animation.

Animation has an unlimited potential to visually represent events, scenarios and forms that have little or no relation to our experience of the ‘real’ world. Implemented in many ways, in many disciplines, it is increasingly influencing our perception and experience of the world we live in. This timely and groundbreaking international conference unites speakers from a wide range of research agendas and creative practices. It facilitates much-needed dialogue centred on the ubiquitous and interdisciplinary nature of animation, its potentially radical future development, and its ethical responsibilities for spatial politics in moving image culture.

The conference’s contributors include Norman Klein, Michael Snow, Vivian Sobchack, Tom Gunning, Anthony McCall, George Griffin, Suzanne Buchan, Beatriz Colomina, Edwin Carels, Siegfried Zielinski, Lisa Cartwright, Johnny Hardstaff and Esther Leslie.

Especially since the digital shift, the uses of animation are no longer exclusive to cinema, and animation’s origins in pre-cinematic optical experiments through avant-garde experimental film continue to evolve in fascinating ways. Artists increasingly incorporate animation in installations and exhibitions, architects use computer animation software to create narratives of space in time, and scientists use it to interpret abstract concepts for a breadth of industries ranging from biomedicine to nanoworlds. Pervasive Animation provides a dynamic international forum to explore animation’s myriad forms and applications across a wide band of creative and professional practice.

Organised by Suzanne Buchan, Reader in Animation Studies and Director of the Animation Research Centre at the University College for the Creative Arts, and Stuart Comer, Curator of Film at Tate. Project Administrator, Maxa Zoller.

A collaboration with the Animation Research Centre, University College for the Creative Arts. Funded by Arts Council England, University College for the Creative Arts and Brunel University West London.

Watch the video recordings of day 1 of the event

Watch the video recordings of day 3 of the event