Pieties or Policies? Symposium – Part 1: Welcome, Andrew Brighton

Pieties or Policies? 2001 Symposium at Tate Modern. Video coverage of the opening session: Welcome,  Andrew Brighton, Public Programmes, Tate Modern

Pieties or Policies? Symposium – Part 2: Cultural Linguistics

Cultural Linguistics

At the start of New Labour’s second term, this 2001 one-day conference examined the ideas and values of government thinking on the arts.

Examining the new orthodoxies

Speakers:
Mark Ryan, Institute of Ideas
Colin MacCabe, Professor of English, University of Exeter, producer, Minerva Pictures.

Pieties or Policies? Symposium – Part 3: Creativity

Creativity

At the start of New Labour’s second term, this one-day conference examined the ideas and values of government thinking on the arts.

‘Everyone is creative. From the pre-school child to the most distinguished scientist or artist, imagination, innovation and original expression are vital components of what it is to be human and to be part of society. Creative thought lies at the heart of almost all cultural activity; it helps to put together those moments of uplift or of enjoyment that mean most to people; and it lies increasingly at the centre of successful economic life in an advance knowledge-based economy. In the years ahead, people’s creativity will increasingly be the key to a country’s cultural identity, to its economic success, and to individuals’ well-being and sense of fulfillment.’ ‘We shall ask Arts and Business to develop a national programme using the inspiration of artists to unlock creativity within business. We need to convince artists that their creativity is indeed transferable to law firms, accountants and many other professions.’ DCMS Green Paper, Culture and Creativity: The Next Ten Years (30 March 2001)

Speakers

Professor Piers Hellawell, Queen’s University, Belfast,- Gresham, Professor of Music
Sandy Nairne, director, National Programmes, Tate
Fiona Shaw, actress
Andrew Summers, chief executive, Design Council
Chair: Tiffany Jenkins, Institute of Ideas

Pieties or Policies? Symposium – Part 4: Social Inclusion and Active Participation

Social Inclusion and Active Participation

At the start of New Labour’s second term, this one-day conference examined the ideas and values of government thinking on the arts.

‘Social inclusion should be mainstreamed as a policy priority for all libraries, museums, galleries and archives… Museums, galleries and archives should develop projects which aim to improve the lives of socially excluded people.’ DCMS, Libraries, Galleries and Archives for All: Cooperating Across the Sectors to Tackle Social Exclusion (February 2001)

Speakers

Claire Fox, director, Institute of Ideas
Fred Manso, director, Southwark Regeneration
Chair: Ivan Hewett, writer and broadcaster

Pieties or Policies? Symposium – Part 5:Joined-up Culture

Joined Up Culture

At the start of New Labour’s second term, this one-day conference examined the ideas and values of government thinking on the arts.

‘(The Green paper) seeks to join up the policies which range across education, economic development and culture to create for the first time coherent pathways for individuals to develop their creativity in culture and media…’ DCMS Green Paper, Culture and Creativity: The Next Ten Years (30 March 2001)

Speakers

Andrew Brighton, Peer Trustee
Lord Matthew Evans, Chairman, Re:source, the Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries
Colin Mercer, director, Cultural Policy and Planning Research Unit at Nottingham Trent University
Vicky Richardson, deputy editor, RIBA Journal
Chair: Tiffany Jenkins, Institute of Ideas

Pieties or Policies? Symposium – Part 6: What Is To Be Done?

What Is To Be Done?

At the start of New Labour’s second term, this one-day conference examined the ideas and values of government thinking on the arts.

What are the principles that should guide cultural policy?

Speakers

Mark Fisher, MP Labour
Dr Frank Furedi, reader of sociology, University of Kent at Canterbury
Joyce McMillan, broadcaster and writer
Anna Somers Cocks, editor, The Art Newspaper
Chair: Tiffany Jenkins, Institute of Ideas

At the start of New Labour’s second term, this one-day conference examined the ideas and values of government thinking on the arts.

It asked those involved in the arts to examine policy and the wider cultural climate, and to address new proposals looking at their implications, tensions and future possibilities. The conference considered the keywords and statements of present cultural policy.

Some examples: Successful societies in the twenty-first century will be those that nurture a spirit of creativity and foster the cultural activity that goes hand in hand with it. Social inclusion should be mainstreamed as a policy priority for all libraries, museums, galleries and archives. Traditional concepts of access will be complemented by a new emphasis of participation.

The government ‘seeks to join up the policies which range across education, economic development and culture to create for the first time coherent pathways for individuals to develop their creativity in culture and media’. What possibilities and dangers do they present? Are there alternative avenues that need to be explored?

A collaboration with the Institute of Ideas.