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  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 8
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 7
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 6
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 5
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 4
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 3
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 2
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico
  • How We Learn MARCO young offenders 1
    Images taken by residents from Escobedo Young Offenders Institute, in a workshop with Tom King and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (MARCO), Mexico

These photographs are the result of a collaboration between the Museum of Contemporary Art Monterrey MARCO, and a group of young offenders at a juvenile detention centre in northeastern Mexico. The workshop used the artist Marysa Dowling’s project “How We Learn” as a framework. Working in small groups the participants were asked to focus on their hands, and consider themes such as everyday gestures, communication, learning, relationships, and identity, while using the space around them as an aid and inspiration. Over four weeks, the young men produced images related to these themes, culminating in the production of short photographic stories based on subjects of their choosing. 

Apart from restrictions such as the visual medium and the available space, the participants were given complete liberty to work and develop their own ideas. For those involved the project became a forum for reflection and communication, with the images representing personal experiences, as well as dreams, thoughts, and emotions. In such an environment hands are physically controlled and restricted. In a sense the hands of these young men are not fully trusted by the world around them. The “How We Learn” framework took on a new dimension within this context, as the hands of the participants became their primary sources of creation and expression, and in some respects freedom. 

Photographer Tom King coordinated and facilitated the project.

Schools, artists, institutions and learning professionals can submit work to be considered for showing in the online exhibition. The gallery is public and all work is moderated. If you would like us to consider your own learning project for the online exhibition, please email us a selection of up to ten images with captions and a brief summary of the project to bpartexchange@tate.org.uk.