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  • Close up of white imprints on blue silk

    Imprints from nature on silk, Meera Curam Studio Azure 2014-2015

    ©Meera Curam

  • Rust dyeing on draped white fabric

    Rust dyeing on fabric, Meera Curam Studio Azure 2014-2015

    ©Meera Curam

  • Close-up of rust dyeing on white fabric

    Rust dyeing on fabric, Meera Curam Studio Azure 2014-2015

    ©Meera Curam

  • Hand painted and screen printed black ink on white silk

    Hand painted and screen printed on silk, Meera Curam Studio Azure 2014-2015

    ©Meera Curam

  • Close-up of hand painted and screen printed black ink on white silk

    Hand painted and screen printed on silk, Meera Curam Studio Azure 2014-2015

    ©Meera Curam

  • Photo of artist painting

    Hand painted fabric wall panels in progress, Meera Curam Studio Azure 2014-2015

    ©Meera Curam

Meera Curam’s artistic practice is rooted in a search to uncover the patterns that memories create in the human mind. The dance of time and space that each stain creates lends itself to Curam’s quest to understand personal and collective memories using textiles as a form.

Curam applies techniques such as rust-dyeing to stain and create patterns, as well as re-using old screen printing screens to create patterned layers onto fabric. Currently her research and artistic practice revolves around change in the colour and shape of textiles in different environments. She is fascinated by permanency, erasure and the ability of a pattern to morph into a totally new form. Curam’s practice explores how the tangible and intangible interpret memory through colour, pattern and form.

Curam currently teaches at Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology in Bangalore, India, facilitating inter-disciplinary projects and courses. These include Tales from Malabar, a traveling museum with narratives from the Mapilla Muslim community;Beyond Sight, Sensorial and Tactile design interventions for the blind and partially sighted; Voicing Cultures: Frameworks and Paradigms exploring the contemporary interpretations of heritage sites and its impact in shaping economic individualism and shifting identities. Curam worked with BP Art Exchange in 2014-2015 to support a group of students from Srishti in their investigation to Frame the Unseen at Kochi-Muziris Biennale. The Srishti students collaborated with a peer group from Central St Martins in London. Both groups created generator ideas for their peers to create work in response to.

Curam has worked on commissions, projects and residencies in India and abroad and currently runs Studio Azure in Bangalore, a working studio committed to innovating traditional and artisan textiles technology for interiors by adapting specialized knowledge in varied techniques, material and forms.