Jacobean refers to the art and culture of the reign of James I (reigned 1603–25)

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  • Paul Van Somer, 'Lady Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent' circa 1619

    Paul Van Somer
    Lady Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent circa 1619
    Oil on wood
    support: 1143 x 819 mm frame: 1306 x 1005 x 75 mm
    Presented by the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1961

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  • Isaac Oliver, 'Charity' circa 1596-1617

    Isaac Oliver
    Charity circa 1596-1617
    Pen and ink, wash and gouache on paper
    support: 114 x 81 mm
    Purchased as part of the Opp Collection with assistance from the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund 1996

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  • Daniel Mytens the Elder, 'Portrait of James Hamilton, Earl of Arran, Later 3rd Marquis and 1st Duke of Hamilton, Aged 17' 1623

    Daniel Mytens the Elder
    Portrait of James Hamilton, Earl of Arran, Later 3rd Marquis and 1st Duke of Hamilton, Aged 17 1623
    Oil on canvas
    support: 2007 x 1251 mm frame: 2275 x 1513 x 100 mm
    Presented by Colin Agnew and Charles Romer Williams 1919

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Although ‘Jacobean’ is particularly used to describe the theatre and furniture of the period it is also used in reference to the painting.

Great Elizabethan miniaturist Nicholas Hilliard was still working during the Jacobean period but was succeeded in royal favour by Isaac Oliver. Similarly Marcus Gheeraerts flourished in the early years of James I’s reign but was overtaken by the more sophisticated naturalism of Dutch-born Paul Van Somer and then Daniel Mytens (pronounced mittens) from about 1616.