A loose association of painters who lived in the St John’s Wood area of London in the 1870s and 1880s, and who aimed to seek a fresh approach to historical subjects

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  • William Frederick Yeames, 'Amy Robsart' exhibited 1877

    William Frederick Yeames
    Amy Robsart exhibited 1877
    Oil on canvas
    support: 2815 x 1885 mm
    Presented by the Trustees of the Chantrey Bequest 1877

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  • Frederick Walker, 'The Woman in White' 1871

    Frederick Walker
    The Woman in White 1871
    Gouache on paper
    support: 2172 x 1289 mm
    Presented by Sir Claude Phillips in memory of his sister Eugenie Phillips 1906

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  • Philip Hermogenes Calderon, 'St Elizabeth of Hungary's Great Act of Renunciation' 1891

    Philip Hermogenes Calderon
    St Elizabeth of Hungary's Great Act of Renunciation 1891
    Oil on canvas
    support: 1530 x 2134 mm
    Presented by the Trustees of the Chantrey Bequest 1891

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In the second half of the nineteenth century the St John’s Wood area of London became a popular location for artists, giving rise to the St John’s Wood Clique. They often also rented Hever Castle in Kent during the summer as an authentic background for their work.

The leader of the group was Philip Hermogenes Calderon together with Frederick Goodall, George Adolphus Storey and William Yeames. Their treatment of historical subject matter resulted in such strangely compelling works as Calderon’s St Elizabeth and Yeames’s Amy Robsart. Yeames also produced one of the most famous Victorian historical pictures, the Civil War subject, When Did You Last See Your Father, in Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.