Marcel Duchamp, 'The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass)' 1915-23, reconstruction by Richard Hamilton 1965-6, lower panel remade 1985

Marcel Duchamp
The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) 1915-23, reconstruction by Richard Hamilton 1965-6, lower panel remade 1985
Oil, lead, dust and varnish on glass
object: 2775 x 1759 mm
Presented by William N. Copley through the American Federation of Arts 1975© Richard Hamilton and Succession Marcel Duchamp/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2002

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Transparency had been an important element in Duchamp’s Large Glass. Picabia used this term to describe the series of grand paintings he made in the late 1920s and early 1930s, consisting of images borrowed from classical and Renaissance art, combined with outlines of hands, animals and flowers.

There was no obvious rationale to Picabia’s selection of images or titles. Some considered this development a retrograde step; others thought he had returned to a belief in ‘great art’. In fact, he seems to have grown bored with modernism, finding it more challenging to re-explore the past. At the same time, his layering of images of different scales echoed aspects of contemporary cinema, and echoed some of the devices used by Man Ray in his photographs of the human figure.