In 1964, Bert Stern produced an image of fashion photographer David Bailey lying on the ground snapping his model Veruschka von Lehndorff towering over him. The photograph anticipates the more aggressive relationship between photography, fashion and celebrity that marked much of the 1970s and 1980s. Celebrity photographers resorted to more aggressive tactics to get exclusives. Ron Galella, whose unauthorised images of Woody Allen and Mia Farrow, Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall are shown here, is one of the most renowned American paparazzi.

Ron Galella Woody Allen / Mia Farrow September 18, 1980 New York City Exclusive – Woody Allen and Mia Farrow heading for dinner in Greenwich Village 1980

Ron Galella 1931
Born and works USA
Woody Allen / Mia Farrow September 18, 1980 New York City Exclusive – Woody Allen and Mia Farrow heading for dinner in Greenwich Village 1980
Gelatin silver print

© Ron Galella, courtesy Galerie Wouter van Leeuwen, Amsterdam

Photography was increasingly a platform for political statement and social protest, such as Richard Avedon’s portrait of the Chicago Seven. This group of anti-Vietnam war activists were accused of instigating a demonstration at the Democratic Party convention that ended in violence. Avedon took them off the streets and into the studio, posing them as if they were pop stars.

Samuel Fosso From a series of self portraits Untitled 1976

Samuel Fosso 1962
Born Cameroon, works Central African Republic
From a series of self portraits Untitled 1976
Gelatin silver print

Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

In Tokyo, Daido Moriyama and Nobuyoshi Araki forged highly experimental street photography practices. Moriyama’s raw and gritty images show a disturbing urban society. Araki’s early conceptual work Tokyo paired images of passers-by taken on the streets with erotically staged pictures of a young woman, often taken indoors. Like Robert Mapplethorpe, Araki has been regularly accused of treading over the contested line between art and pornography.