Olafur Eliasson: Turner colour experiments
Tate Britain: Display
26 August 201425 January 2015

Clore Galleries

Free

Olafur Eliasson, creator of the acclaimed Turbine Hall commission The Weather Project 2003, has made a new series of paintings in response to the work of J.M.W. Turner

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  • Olafur Eliasson, Colour experiment no. 58

    Olafur Eliasson
    Colour experiment no. 58 2014

    © 2013 Olafur Eliasson

  • Olafur Eliasson, Colour experiment no. 61

    Olafur Eliasson
    Colour experiment no. 61 2014

    © 2013 Olafur Eliasson

  • Olafur Eliasson, Colour experiment no. 60

    Olafur Eliasson
    Colour experiment no. 60 2014

    © 2013 Olafur Eliasson

  • Installation view of Olafur Eliasson's Colour experiment no. 60

    Olafur Eliasson
    Installation view: Colour experiment no. 60 2014

    © 2013 Olafur Eliasson

  • Installation view of Olafur Eliasson's Colour experiment no. 60, two people looking at the artwork

    Olafur Eliasson
    Installation view: Colour experiment no. 60 2014

    © 2013 Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson has analysed seven paintings by Turner to create Turner colour experiments, which isolate and record Turner’s use of light and colour. 

Turner colour experiments relate to an ongoing series of Colour experiment paintings which began in 2009 when Eliasson started analysing pigments, paint production and application of colour in order to mix paint in the exact colour for each nanometre of the visible light spectrum.

Turner colour experiments demonstrate Turner’s continued relevance to and fascination for artists today and will coincide with Tate Britain’s major autumn exhibition, The EY Exhibition: Late Turner – Painting Set Free.

Olafur Eliasson says: 

Turner’s ability to shape and frame light in his paintings has had a significant impact on my work….In the Turner colour experiments, I’ve isolated light and colour in Turner’s works in order to extract his sense of ephemera from the objects of desire that his paintings have become.  The schematic arrays of colours on round canvases generate a feeling of endlessness and allow the viewer to take in the artwork in a decentralised, meandering way.

About Olafur Eliasson

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson was born in 1967 in Copenhagen, where he attended the Royal Academy of Arts and is based in Berlin.

His work has been exhibited extensively internationally. Eliasson’s new paintings will be on display at the Clore Galleries, Tate Britain.

The exhibition is curated by Elizabeth Jacklin and Lizzie Carey-Thomas, Tate Britain.

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