Joseph Mallord William Turner, 'Three Sketches of Pictures, ?by Claude' 1821

Joseph Mallord William Turner
Three Sketches of Pictures, ?by Claude 1821
Pencil on paper
support: 118 x 123 mm
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856

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Drawn from Turner

Clive Garland, Frewen College, formerly Camberwell College of Arts

Clive Garland studied at Camberwell College of Art (1969 - 1973). In 1974 he received an Italian Government Scholarship to Accademia Di Belle Arti, Perugia. From 1974 -5 he studied at Goldsmiths College, University of London, and later in 1975 received an Arts Council of Great Britain Minor Award. In 1992 he received The Mark Rothko Fellowship. From 2001 - 2006 he was Course Leader BA (Hons) Drawing at Camberwell College and is currently Head of Art at Frewen College. 

Clive Garland Three Sketches of Pictures, ?by Claude circa 1830

Clive Garland
Three Sketches of Pictures, ?by Claude c.1830

Clive Garland After Turner Three Sketches of Pictures, ?by Claude circa 1830

Clive Garland
After Turner Three Sketches of Pictures, ?by Claude c.1830

Having been enthralled by Turner’s works since my student days, this project revived an interest in studying some rarely seen drawings. I chose a sketchbook work of Turner, analysing the works of Claude, working out the raising and lowering of the horizon line and how he contrived to make the viewer aware and settle on a distanct view. 

I studied the drawing intensely for 3-4 hours in the print room making notes, measurements and journeying around the work with the aid of a magnifying glass. 

Later – in common with Turner, I made these drawings while staying in France - I made two initial studies from this, trying to engage with his precise placement, examining perspective, space and the minute detail. 

Turner always worked with great individuality, other artists having a limited lasting influence. In short, Turner was always himself, using his wealth of visual language as an innovator. Another work on a larger scale enabled me to explore ideas that carried a sense of mystery and appealed to the intellect.