Joseph Mallord William Turner, 'Looking Back to the Pic de l'Oeillette, Gorges du Guiers Mort, Grande Chartreuse' 1802
Joseph Mallord William Turner
Looking Back to the Pic de l'Oeillette, Gorges du Guiers Mort, Grande Chartreuse 1802
Chalk, gouache and pencil on paper
support: 284 x 213 mm
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856

Drawn from Turner

Will Alsop RA, architect
Will Alsop is an architect and Royal Academician. His design for Peckham Library won the Stirling Prize for Architecture in 2000. He is also Professor of Architecture at Vienna Technical University.

To spend time with an original Turner drawing and viewing it from the perspective of making a drawing of a drawing, results firstly in acting as a detective.
As more time is spent, the bravery of Turner becomes infectious and this gives me a freedom that is only tethered by my own imagination of what Turner himself might be saying to us.

After Turner from Grenoble Sketchbook [Finberg LXXIV], Looking Back to the Pic de l'Oeillette, Gorges du Guiers Mort, Grande Chartreuse 1802
Will Alsop
After Turner from Grenoble Sketchbook [Finberg LXXIV], Looking Back to the Pic de l'Oeillette, Gorges du Guiers Mort, Grande Chartreuse 1802

Carinna Parraman, Centre for Fine Print Research, University of the West of England
Carinna Parraman is a printmaker and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Fine Print Research at the University of the West of England, Bristol. She is working with Tate to catalogue the modern print collection by process. She also heads a pan European research network on the training and the exchange of ideas relating to the subject of colour.

As a printmaker, and having studied German Renaissance prints, I was attracted to the chiaroscuro quality of Turner’s drawing. In this work, he uses a combination of contrasting achromatic pencils. The three hours disappeared quickly. I wanted to gain an understanding of Turner’s approach to composition and perspective through light and shade. I began my drawing with the small arched building and, by working outwards, plotted the placement of rocks, trees and wall in relation to the building. I became interested in the cross hatching of the rocks, circular marks to describe trees and bushes and Turner’s quite deliberate use of small elements to give an indication of detail. The white pencil marks were added last.

Carinna Parraman After Turner from Grenoble Sketchbook [Finberg LXXIV], Looking Back to the Pic de l'Oeillette, Gorges du Guiers Mort, Grande Chartreuse 1802
Carinna Parraman
After Turner from Grenoble Sketchbook [Finberg LXXIV], Looking Back to the Pic de l'Oeillette, Gorges du Guiers Mort, Grande Chartreuse 1802