Joseph Mallord William Turner, 'A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond' 1792-3

Joseph Mallord William Turner
A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792-3
Pencil on paper
support: 212 x 272 mm
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856

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Drawn from Turner

 Rebecca Ash, Tate

Rebecca Ash works at Tate as an Art Handling Technician. She trained at Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College and Norwich School of Art and Design where she gained a BA in Fine Art Painting in 2004. Rebecca’s current practice is concerned with adapting uncontrolled paint accidents to create multi-layered compositions. Past exhibitions include Waterloo Gallery London, Hereford All Saints Church, The Inspired Art Fair London Bridge and Hanbrinker Hotel, Amsterdam.

I chose this drawing as a challenge. It is small and intricate; the marks made are minimal because of Turner’s precision and accuracy. This style of drawing is a complete contrast to the free angular lines I usually make. 

I had to discipline myself to make this drawing using curved, accurate lines. 

The biggest challenge, for me, in this particular drawing was ensuring the separate sections of the composition worked as one. 

A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond

Rebecca Ash
After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792–3

 Jeanine Breaker, Central St Martins College of Art and Design 

Jeanine Breaker studied at the University of Southern California before receiving a Masters of Fine Arts degree from the University of California in 1980. She has exhibited, been an artist in residence and visiting lecturer throughout North America, Europe, Australia, and the UK. She was a Leverhulme Fellow and AHRC grant holder at the Royal College of Art (2002-4) and is currently an AHRC Fellow in the Creative and Performing Arts at Central St Martin’s School of Art (2004-7) researching the essence of gesture by combining traditional drawing with new technology. The William Turner Gallery in Bergamont Station, Santa Monica, California, represents her work. 

I was particularly drawn to the horse and wagon vignette in this drawing because of its energy and economy of line. I was challenged by the activity of copying another artist’s gestural lines, which seemed inherently paradoxical. I found it surprisingly pleasurable, almost therapeutic. I decided to enlarge the image to see if these lines in my hands could retain their energy at a less intimate scale, and if the mystery of the ghost image to the left would be revealed. The horse’s blank face, the fear in the face of the other, the concept of appropriation of a master, just begged for a ‘Chapman Brothers’ twist.

A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore...1792–3

Jeanine Breaker
After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792–3

Frances Newman, MA student, Camberwell College of Arts  

Frances Newman graduated from the MA Drawing course at Camberwell College of Arts in June 2006

Frances Newman After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792-3

Frances Newman
After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792–3

Sherine Osseiran, BA student, Chelsea College of Art and Design   

Sherine Osserian was born in Lebanon and is currently a final year student on the BA Fine Art (Painting) course at Chelsea College of Art & Design. She previously studied painting in the Netherlands and Interior Design in Lebanon. 

Sherine Osseiran After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792-3 Sherine Osseiran After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy W

Sherine Osseiran
After Turner A Man with a Cart and Horses on the Shore, Boats in Choppy Water Beyond 1792–3