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  • Peter Doig, 'Ski Jacket' 1994

    Peter Doig
    Ski Jacket 1994
    Oil on canvas
    support, right: 2953 x 1604 x 33 mm support, left: 2950 x 1900 x 33 mm
    Purchased with assistance from Evelyn, Lady Downshire's Trust Fund 1995 Peter Doig

    View the main page for this artwork

  • Peter Doig Pond Life 1993

    Peter Doig
    Pond Life 1993
    Oil on canvas

    Private collection
    © Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro Gallery,London

  • Peter Doig Cobourg 3 + 1 more 1994 painting of a group of people standing at the shore of a lake or rive with woods on the other side The image is almost obliterated by a white haze

    Peter Doig
    Cobourg 3 + 1 more 1994
    Oil on canvas

    Provinzial Rheinland Versicherung Düsseldorf
    © The artist

  • Peter Doig Blotter 1993 painting of a man standing in a pond surrounded by snow and woods

    Peter Doig
    Blotter 1993
    Oil on canvas

    National Museums Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery
    © The artist

  • Peter Doig Window Pane 1993 painting of a partially melted pond surrounded by snow

    Peter Doig
    Window Pane 1993
    Oil on canvas

    © Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro Gallery, London

At various stages in his career, Doig has consciously sought to free up his approach to making paintings, often by tackling new subjects. The winter sports and frozen ponds featured in these works, though painted from the artist’s London studio, are everyday Canadian scenes. Doig leaves behind any documentary value in the photographic sources he employs; instead, his pictures invoke a dream-like state. The artist had been working on Pond Life 1993 for three months before he added the reflection of the three figures, opening up the painting from a recognisable reality to something more magical. 

In Ski Jacket 1994, a newspaper image of a Japanese ski resort combined in his mind with ideas of Japanese scroll painting; he doubled its size by adding a second panel. The very choice of snow subjects, and the saccharine colour palette, disconcerted many observers in the London art world at the time. However, his boldness was recognised when he was awarded the John Moores Prize in 1993 for Blotter and nominated for the Turner Prize the following year.