Still from Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze), Chloe Cooper
Still from Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze), Chloe Cooper

A major event for your calendar in Autumn 2013

Explore the new chronological hang and be the first to experience the new Learning spaces including a Learning studio, gallery and digital suite at Tate Britain.

Framed by Nick Addison’s, University of the Arts London (CLTAD), arguments around ‘difference’ within the educational system, the evening takes an expanded look at Special Educational Needs in schools and galleries. Addison’s talk explores the role of art as an ‘affective machine’ in thinking about difference within education. Affective encounters, such as those with art, produce ways of feeling and make us act. Responding to the new chronological hang at Tate Britain and the art work in the 1960s room, Addison investigates the ways in which acknowledging difference by attending to affect enhances learning.

Participating artists

Chloe Cooper, Shaun Doyle, Sam Keogh, Louisa Martin and Mónica Rivas Velásquez.

Programme

18.45–19.05

Nick Addison talk, Difference, Affect and Learning

19.15, 19.30 and 19.45

Shaun Doyle, Punk Silent Disco

19.15–20.15

Chloe Cooper, Feeling Totally Bronze

19.20, 19.40 and 20.00

Louisa Martin, You Only Live Twice

All evening 18.30–20.30

Chloe Cooper, Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze) video
Sam Keogh, Taken out of/put into Oscar’s bin
Mónica Rivas Velásquez, A Situation Of posters and PLATFORM resource
Louisa Martin, As If resource
Time Map gallery timeline of British history
Materials for the Construction of Meaning (MCM) resource
BP Art Exchange project

Chloe Cooper, Feeling Totally Bronze

Artist Chloe Cooper invites you to take on the role of ‘Gallery Visitor Caught Up In A School Workshop / Audience Member’. In this performance of a workshop, teachers strive to emulate the affective qualities of selected bronze sculptures. Exploring the nature of the workshop as performative spectacle, Chloe Cooper draws out questions she first considered in her film Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze) also being screened this evening. What is being learnt and by whom within the workshop?

We are looking for participants for Chloe Cooper’s performance. If you would like to take part in the performance in the role of ‘Workshop participant’, find out more here.

Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze) video

Watch Chloe Cooper’s video Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze) which she made in response to leading schools workshops at Tate last year. The video plays with our expectations of the role of the artist working in gallery education, as it moves between interpreter, facilitator, expert, student and teacher.

Shaun Doyle, Punk Silent Disco

Experience the art and music of the 1970s in a Punk silent disco. Artist Shaun Doyle considers analogies between the sentiments in the music and the structures and content of the artworks. Over the evening each track will be followed with a conversation orchestrated by Shaun Doyle. How does popular culture influence high art? How can music help to interpret other art forms? How do politics and social issues influence high and low art simultaneously?

Sam Keogh, Taken out of/put into Oscar’s bin

By nature, Oscar the Grouch is messy, hypocritical and antagonistic. Unceremoniously interrupting proceedings, Sam Keogh’s performance Taken out of/put into Oscar’s bin activates these traits as the messy figure of Oscar entangled in the senses of the viewer.

Louisa Martin, You Only Live Twice

You Only Live Twice is a live performative video exploring how our imaginary selves enable us to access other experiences and ways of thinking which might be more in tune with our spirit, our desires, and our need for growth. YOLT indicates, through non-linguistic means, the way to ‘the lighthouse’; a fictional site sought by the group of gallery explorers featured in the resource As If.

As If is a story that draws on Martin’s interest in portals and ‘pataphysics’. The book is an invitation to the imagination and a suggestion of an approach to looking at artworks in the gallery.

Mónica Rivas Velásquez, A Situation Of

Experience A Situation Of artist Mónica Rivas Velásquez’s series of posters in connection with the new resource PLATFORM. Stemming from the artist’s interest in the work of Julia Kristeva, the ideas and words have both informed the development of PLATFORM and echo the space for conversation offered by the resource. The expression ‘A person in a situation of disability’ re-frames how we regard uniqueness and ability, prompting us to consider the mutually defining relationship between individuality and difference, the self and the other, collaboration and agency.

Developed to support teaching staff working within a broad range of SEN as well as teachers in mainstream educational settings visiting the gallery on independent visits, PLATFORM is an invitation to the groups to explore Tate Britain and Tate Modern through activities which aim to encourage active exploration, open-ended experimentation and autonomous choice making.

Time Map

Explore the gallery’s new timeline of British history in response to the chronological walk through British art made in collaboration with the Schools and Teachers team, artists Meera Chauda and Helen Rousseau and Year 5 from St Gabriel’s Primary school,Westminster.

Materials for the Construction of Meaning (MCM)

Designed as a catalyst for group debate in relation to the collection, the Materials for the Construction of Meaning (MCM) prompts can be used in any order, independently or in relation to each other, and consist of selected words, questions and quotations which are there to provoke discussion around the making and construction of meaning in art.

Devised by artists Katriona Beales, Helen Rousseau and curator Martine Rouleau, the resource is available to self led groups visiting Tate Britain.

BP Art Exchange

Drop in to the Taylor Digital Studio and meet the BP Art Exchange team whilst you try out a range of touch screen applications developed with artists specifically for use by young people with special educational needs. BP Art Exchange is Tate’s new international online learning project. There will be a chance to sign up on the night, pick up a free activity pack and talk to the team.

Register for BP Art Exchange here

Call for participants

Gallery visitor caught up in school workshop/audience member

Chloe Cooper would like to invite 10 people to perform the role of ‘Workshop Participants’ in a performance of a workshop that strives to emulate the affective qualities of selected bronze sculptures in the gallery. The performance takes place at this Learning private view (25 November 2013 at Tate Britain, 19.15–20.15). No rehearsal is required and no previous performance experience is necessary. The roles are not scripted and involve you responding naturally to what you are being asked to do. The performance aims to embrace the roles of scepticism, embarrassment, surprise and jubilation in the learning experience through the exploration of the affective qualities of the bronze sculptures on show.

The performance will be listed in the programme but there will be no formal audience apart from other visitors to the Learning private view who will observe now and then and sometimes be asked to actively participate in the role of ‘Gallery visitor caught up in school workshop/audience member’.

This is an extension of an earlier work produced by Chloe Cooper as a response to being an artist leading schools workshops on the schools programme at Tate Britain and Tate Modern during 2012–13. Watch this work: Bronzin’ (Totally Bronze)

If you would like to take part in the performance in the role of ‘Workshop participant’, please email elizabeth.graham@tate.org.uk and sarah.jarvis@tate.org.uk
Participants will be confirmed on a first come first served basis

If you are interested and would like to discuss the performance further, Chloe is really happy to answer any questions you might have via email at chloe.cooper_art@hotmail.co.uk