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  • Phillip Dodd

    Phillip Dodd

    © BBC

  • Dr Gus Casely-Hayford

    Dr Gus Casely-Hayford

  • Kim Evans

    Kim Evans

    © Kim Evans

Chaired by broadcaster, writer and curator Philip Dodd, this discussion asks: 

What would a contemporary landmark arts programme look like now?

Join our panel for a wide-ranging and lively discussion. What is the future of arts broadcasting? What does it mean to explore art through the prism of a landmark series? How might new technologies affect the broadcasting landscape? Is the ‘grand vision’ model of arts broadcasting obsolete? 

Featuring historian and broadcaster Dr Nina Ramirez (The Art of the Vikings: Secret Knowledge), artist Susan Hiller, Kim Evans (formerly Head of Music and Arts, BBC and Executive Director, Arts at Arts Council England) and curator and historian Dr Gus Casely-Hayford (Lost Kingdoms of Africa, The Genius of British Art).

In partnership with BBC Radio 3, this event will be broadcast at 22.00 on 5 June BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking programme

Biographies

Susan Hiller

Hiller was born in the United States and has lived and worked in London since the 1960’s. After several exhibitions of her paintings and a series of collaborative ‘group investigations’, in the early 1980’s she began to make innovative use of audio and visual technology. Her groundbreaking installations, multi-screen videos and audio works have achieved international recognition and are widely acknowledged to be a major influence on younger British artists. 

With a practice extending over 40 years, Susan Hiller is considered one of the most influential artists of her generation. Her work is found internationally in both private and public collections and her career has been recognised by mid-career survey exhibitions at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts (1986) and Tate Liverpool (1996), and, most recently by, a major retrospective exhibition at Tate Britain (2011). 

Dr Janina Ramirez

Ramirez gained her degree in English literature and language (specialising in Old and Middle English) from St Anne’s College, Oxford. She then completed her post-graduate studies at the renowned Centre for Medieval Studies, York, where her love of medieval art flourished. She is course director for the Undergraduate Certificate in History of Art at the University of Oxford, and has presented a number of documentaries for BBC Television including The Viking Sagas, and Britain’s Most Fragile Treasure. Her three-part series for BBC Four, Illuminations: The Private Lives of Medieval Kings aired in 2012. She has just finished writing and presenting Chivalry and Betrayal: The Hundred Years’ War and a new documentary The Art of the Vikings: Secret Knowledge

Dr Gus Casely-Hayford

Dr Gus Casely-Hayford is an art historian who writes and broadcasts widely on African culture. Former Executive Director of Arts Strategy, Arts Council England, and Ex-Director of the Institute of International Contemporary Art, Gus has offered leadership to some of the most high profile arts organisations in Britain. He is currently a Research Associate at the School of African Studies, and Kings College University of London, a member of Tate Britain Council, sits on the development board of the Young Vic and is a Trustee of the National Portrait Gallery. Gus is well known for his major BBC TV series The Lost Kingdoms of Africa. Using new archaeological and anthropological research he explores the pre-colonial history of some of Africa’s most important kingdoms.

Kim Evans

Evans began her career as a documentary filmmaker on The South Bank Show and continued it at the BBC where she won a BAFTA for her film Angela Carter’s Curious Room. She went on to become Head of Music & Arts at the BBC and then Executive Director of Arts at Arts Council England. She is currently a Trustee of the National Portrait Gallery and Chair of Clean Break theatre company. She also works with a wide range of individuals and arts organisations as a mentor and advisor. In 2007 she was awarded an OBE for her services to the arts.

This event is related to the exhibition Kenneth Clark – Looking for Civilisation
Cancelled