The girl who killed the boy who cried wolf, Screenplay, Frank Wasser, 2014
The girl who killed the boy who cried wolf, Screenplay, Frank Wasser, 2014

Taking its cue from the wealth of relevant examples present in the collection the session sets out to explode and explore this common marriage of terms in multiple and unexpected ways. We will consider the use of language and text in art and question how language shapes our encounter with art within an institution such as Tate.

For this year’s Art and Language study day artist Frank Wasser explores the question: what constitutes as language in an art context? Writing, sound, the voice, photography, painting, sculpture, the body, satyr, parody, comedy, a single gesture, politics? Modern and contemporary art are rich in multiple languages and visual vocabularies that shape what way we encounter and disseminate images. This study day sets out to investigate language in art by looking at the materials, production and discourses present in the gallery. Joseph Noonan-Ganley, current Schools Workshops artist, will join Frank and the group for a short discussion on writing as a material.

3 for 2 offer

Schools booking two study days will receive a third free place to attend a session for any member of staff.

Other study days in the Art & series

Art & the Archive, 2 July 2014, 10.30–17.00 Tate Britain
Art & SEN, 16 May 2014, 10.30–17.00 Tate Modern
Art & Interpretation, 20 June 2014, 10.30–17.00 Tate Modern