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  • Lyubov Popova Painterly Architectonic 1918

    Lyubov Popova
    Painterly Architectonic 1918

    Iaroslavl State Art Museum

  • Alexander Rodchenko Non-Objective Painting 1917 abstract painting

    Alexander Rodchenko
    Non-Objective Painting 1917

    Ivanovo Regional Art Museum
    © A. Rodchenko & V. Stepanova Archive / DACS 2009

  • Alexander Rodchenko Non-Objective Composition

    Alexander Rodchenko
    Non-Objective Composition 1918

    Dagestan Museum of the Arts, Makhachkala
    © A. Rodchenko & V. Stepanova Archive / DACS 2009

  • Alexander Rodchenko Composition no.61 (from the series 'Concentration of Colour' 1918

    Alexander Rodchenko
    Composition no.61 (from the series ‘Concentration of Colour’) 1918

    Ivanovo Regional Art Museum
    © A. Rodchenko & V. Stepanova Archive / DACS 2009

  • Lyubov Popova Painterly Architectonic 1918

    Lyubov Popova
    Painterly Architectonic 1918

    P. Simon Family Collection

  • Alexander Rodchenko Black on Black from the series 'Black on Black' 1918

    Alexander Rodchenko
    Black on Black from the series ‘Black on Black’ 1918

    Vasnetsovs Regional Art Museum, Kirov
    © A. Rodchenko & V. Stepanova Archive / DACS 2009

The Bolshevik Revolution aimed to transform an entire civilisation, and artists were among the first to show their support. There was already a distinct strain of utopianism in the Russian avant-garde – a determination to reinvent art, as if from zero. Kasimir Malevich’s abstract paintings freed art from what he called ‘the dead weight of the real world’. Equally radical were Vladimir Tatlin’s Counter-Reliefs, made by assembling real materials, such as wood, glass and metal into three-dimensional constructions.

Following these examples, the Constructivists rejected all ideas of illusory representation. Rodchenko focused on faktura, the physical qualities of the painting: the use of different paints and different textures, and how these related to other elements such as the painting surface, or the choice of colour. His experiments led to the ‘Black on Black’ series, in which the elimination of colour focused attention on the texture of the painting’s surface, and its interaction with light. In these works, Stepanova wrote, ‘nothing but painting exists’.

Popova’s Painterly Architectonics respond to some of Malevich’s ideas, but push them further. Geometric shapes jostle together, overlapping,intersecting, their edges pressing beyond the frame. A dynamic sense of instability and movement is matched by her use of strong colour. As the title suggests, Popova was already looking beyond painting, into architecture and three-dimensional structures, yet cramming that expansive energy onto the flat surface of a painting.