John Akomfrah CBE, The Unfinished Conversation 2012 . Tate . © John Akomfrah / Smoking Dogs Films

Room 15 in Walk Through British Art

Sixty Years: The Unfinished Conversation

A roaring success

The Sunday Times

If you thought you knew British art, visit and think again … there is no better place to go

The Mail on Sunday

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Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Abiku (Born to Die)  1988, printed c.1988

This is one of a group of four black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the larger series Abiku (Born to Die) 1988 (Tate P82469–P82472). In this series Fani Kayode has captured a black male model in different nude poses, his face deliberately turned away from the camera or obscured. In one, the model appears to the bottom left of the frame with only his upper chest visible and his head tilted backwards. His neck appears to be positioned between a pair of large, open scissors, yet their translucency makes it clear that this print is a double exposure: the two images were shot separately and the negatives were then exposed onto the same sheet of paper.

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Maud Sulter, Les Bijoux II  2002

Les Bijoux 2002 is a series of photographs that comprises nine large-scale Polaroids of equal size that present a sequence of performative self-portraits by the British artist Maud Sulter. Adopting a similar posture in each image, the artist appears dressed in various lavish gowns and jewellery set against a black studio background. The works are numbered sequentially with Roman numerals, although they can be displayed separately and in any order. In seven of the images, Sulter looks directly at the camera while in two (numbers II, Tate P82548, and VIII, Tate P82554) she appears in profile. Her face presents a subtle array of dignified emotions, from desire to grief, and in two of the images (numbers III, Tate P82549, and VII, Tate P82553) she tugs at her necklace as if to break it. Made using a large-format Polaroid camera, the raw edges of the prints are left visible and the photographs’ white margins are muddied with residue from the Polaroid instant printing process.

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Maud Sulter, Les Bijoux VII  2002

Les Bijoux 2002 is a series of photographs that comprises nine large-scale Polaroids of equal size that present a sequence of performative self-portraits by the British artist Maud Sulter. Adopting a similar posture in each image, the artist appears dressed in various lavish gowns and jewellery set against a black studio background. The works are numbered sequentially with Roman numerals, although they can be displayed separately and in any order. In seven of the images, Sulter looks directly at the camera while in two (numbers II, Tate P82548, and VIII, Tate P82554) she appears in profile. Her face presents a subtle array of dignified emotions, from desire to grief, and in two of the images (numbers III, Tate P82549, and VII, Tate P82553) she tugs at her necklace as if to break it. Made using a large-format Polaroid camera, the raw edges of the prints are left visible and the photographs’ white margins are muddied with residue from the Polaroid instant printing process.

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Larry Achiampong, Integer #3  2015

This is one of a group of photographs in Tate’s collection by Larry Achiampong (see Tate P15463, P82629–P82634). Spanning a number of years, they form part of an ambitious and ongoing photographic project that seeks to examine how homogenising racist stereotypes obfuscate and dehumanise the identities of Black people. The digitally manipulated photographs are derived from family photograph albums, showing individuals and family groups. In each case, the heads of the figures have been replaced with identical black circles bearing no features other than a pair of bright red lips. The original source photographs were all drawn from Achiampong’s own family archive, passed to him by his mother. In fact, most were taken by his mother and he considers her as an integral part of a collaborative conversation. Achiampong began working through these family archives in 2013 and has gradually been selecting images that speak to him from across family members, time and place. Some, like Integer #3, Glyth Series 1 #3, Glyth Series 2 #2 and Glyth Series 2 #3, are formally posed, the protagonists in smart dress; one can imagine that their eyes, though obscured, would be looking at the camera. In contrast, the scenes in Cipher #1, Decimal #3 and Speckle #1 capture the immediacy and informality of everyday life. Each title – ‘Cipher’, ‘Glyth’, ‘Integer’ and ‘Speckle’ – refers in an abstract way to the shape of the black dots that replace each of the faces.

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Larry Achiampong, Glyth Series 2 #2  2018

This is one of a group of photographs in Tate’s collection by Larry Achiampong (see Tate P15463, P82629–P82634). Spanning a number of years, they form part of an ambitious and ongoing photographic project that seeks to examine how homogenising racist stereotypes obfuscate and dehumanise the identities of Black people. The digitally manipulated photographs are derived from family photograph albums, showing individuals and family groups. In each case, the heads of the figures have been replaced with identical black circles bearing no features other than a pair of bright red lips. The original source photographs were all drawn from Achiampong’s own family archive, passed to him by his mother. In fact, most were taken by his mother and he considers her as an integral part of a collaborative conversation. Achiampong began working through these family archives in 2013 and has gradually been selecting images that speak to him from across family members, time and place. Some, like Integer #3, Glyth Series 1 #3, Glyth Series 2 #2 and Glyth Series 2 #3, are formally posed, the protagonists in smart dress; one can imagine that their eyes, though obscured, would be looking at the camera. In contrast, the scenes in Cipher #1, Decimal #3 and Speckle #1 capture the immediacy and informality of everyday life. Each title – ‘Cipher’, ‘Glyth’, ‘Integer’ and ‘Speckle’ – refers in an abstract way to the shape of the black dots that replace each of the faces.

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Claudette Johnson, Standing Figure with African Masks  2018

To create this work Johnson drew herself using a small mirror on a low chair. She gazes directly down on us, at an angle that heightens her confident stance. She has said, ‘I’m interested in giving space to Blackwomen presence. A presence which has been distorted, hidden and denied.’ The masked figures in the background reclaim the often unacknowledged inspiration of African art on white Western artists. By referring to the masks as ‘African’, Johnson draws attention to art history’s failure to record the names, or even the nationalities of the artists of these influential works.

Gallery label, December 2020

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Donald Locke, Untitled  1993

This is one of a group of three Untitled works on paper in Tate’s collection by the Black British artist Donald Locke (see Tate L04350–52). Dating from 1993, they were executed in acrylic paint on hand-made paper. Each one depicts two or three figures that seem to be dancing together, swinging their arms and legs, or engaging in other exchanges, standing in each other’s proximity or touching each other. More animal-like than human, the figures’ outlines are delineated with sinuous brush marks. They are among many drawings and studies that Locked produced regularly. The figures depicted allude to Masquerade dancers, typical of the artist’s native Guyana and of other countries in the West Indies. Masquerade dancers are performers who wear costumes of specific characters relating to folkloric traditions that can be traced back to the time of slavery and to elements of ritual sub-Saharan African dances of war, guardianship and fertility. Locke often returned to persistent images that lived in his memory. Alongside those of Masquerade dancers, he frequently drew on other images from traditional folk stories and mythologised historical figures.

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Donald Locke, Untitled  1993

This is one of a group of three Untitled works on paper in Tate’s collection by the Black British artist Donald Locke (see Tate L04350–52). Dating from 1993, they were executed in acrylic paint on hand-made paper. Each one depicts two or three figures that seem to be dancing together, swinging their arms and legs, or engaging in other exchanges, standing in each other’s proximity or touching each other. More animal-like than human, the figures’ outlines are delineated with sinuous brush marks. They are among many drawings and studies that Locked produced regularly. The figures depicted allude to Masquerade dancers, typical of the artist’s native Guyana and of other countries in the West Indies. Masquerade dancers are performers who wear costumes of specific characters relating to folkloric traditions that can be traced back to the time of slavery and to elements of ritual sub-Saharan African dances of war, guardianship and fertility. Locke often returned to persistent images that lived in his memory. Alongside those of Masquerade dancers, he frequently drew on other images from traditional folk stories and mythologised historical figures.

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Mona Hatoum, So Much I Want to Say  1983

Born into a Palestinian family in Beirut, and now resident in London, Hatoum often addresses themes of identity and exile in her work. This video consists of still images of her face in close-up, with a pair of male hands covering her mouth which prevent her from speaking. 'My work is about my experience of living in the West as a person from the Third World, about being an outsider, about occupying a marginal position, being excluded, being defined as 'Other' or as one of 'Them', Hatoum has said.

Gallery label, November 2006

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Veronica Ryan, Gravitas Profundis II  2000

These photographic works belong to a series that Ryan produced while she was artist-in-residence at Tate St Ives from 1998–2000. During this time, she worked in the former studio of British sculptor Barbara Hepworth (19 03 –1975). Ryan found that the Cornish peninsula reminded her strongly of the island of Montserrat in the Caribbean where she was born and lived until emigrating with her family to the UK as a young child. Montserrat suffered a natural disaster in 1995 when the Soufrière Hills volcano erupted, covering the southern half of the island in ash and rendering it uninhabitable. Here, Ryan applies black ink and white paint to a photograph from her family archive, shrouding the figures in a manner which mirrors the obliterating effects of the eruption. The Latin title loosely translates as ‘profound weight’.

Gallery label, February 2022

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Donald Rodney, In the House of My Father  1996–7

In the artist's open hand is a sculpture made from sections of his own skin. These were removed when he was having treatment for sickle cell anaemia.

Rodney uses autobiography to address larger social and political issues from the perspective of a black British man. He also deals with more personal issues of identity, family and home. This small house has been seen as symbolising 'the fragility and the near-futility of Rodney having to live within a structure hopelessly unable to sustain itself'.

Gallery label, August 2004

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Donald Locke, Untitled  1993

This is one of a group of three Untitled works on paper in Tate’s collection by the Black British artist Donald Locke (see Tate L04350–52). Dating from 1993, they were executed in acrylic paint on hand-made paper. Each one depicts two or three figures that seem to be dancing together, swinging their arms and legs, or engaging in other exchanges, standing in each other’s proximity or touching each other. More animal-like than human, the figures’ outlines are delineated with sinuous brush marks. They are among many drawings and studies that Locked produced regularly. The figures depicted allude to Masquerade dancers, typical of the artist’s native Guyana and of other countries in the West Indies. Masquerade dancers are performers who wear costumes of specific characters relating to folkloric traditions that can be traced back to the time of slavery and to elements of ritual sub-Saharan African dances of war, guardianship and fertility. Locke often returned to persistent images that lived in his memory. Alongside those of Masquerade dancers, he frequently drew on other images from traditional folk stories and mythologised historical figures.

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James Barnor, Eva, London  1960s, printed 2010

This is one of a group of black and white and colour photographs in Tate’s collection taken by James Barnor in the 1960s (Tate P13419–P13421, P13484, P14381–P14384). Barnor’s portraiture played a key role in documenting black women and men who, in the post-war period, had immigrated to Britain from African countries and were establishing their identity as British. His photographs include images of unnamed subjects, such the two smartly-dressed women in Wedding Guests, London 1960s who pose in front of one of the classic British telephone boxes designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, presumably on their way to a wedding. Other portraits feature public figures, such as the radio journalist Mike Eghan, host of a popular Ghanaian talk show aired on the BBC (Mike Eghan at BBC Studios, London 1967 and Mike Eghan at Piccadilly Circus, London 1967). One image documents the visit of American boxing legend Muhammad Ali to London in 1966, showing Ali training in advance of a fight (Muhammad Ali Training, Earl’s Court, London 1966). A number of shots feature portraits of ‘cover girls’ that were originally published as covers for the magazine Drum, a publication originally from South Africa (Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London 1966, Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London 1966). In Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London the model poses at one of London’s most iconic sites; in Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London she stands in a London street, leaning against a car. These photographs capture the mood and fashion of London’s ‘swinging Sixties’, as well as the aspiration of Black immigrants to integrate into British society.

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James Barnor, Flamingo cover girl Sarah with friend, London  c.1965, printed 2010

This is one of a group of black and white and colour photographs in Tate’s collection taken by James Barnor in the 1960s (Tate P13419–P13421, P13484, P14381–P14384). Barnor’s portraiture played a key role in documenting black women and men who, in the post-war period, had immigrated to Britain from African countries and were establishing their identity as British. His photographs include images of unnamed subjects, such the two smartly-dressed women in Wedding Guests, London 1960s who pose in front of one of the classic British telephone boxes designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, presumably on their way to a wedding. Other portraits feature public figures, such as the radio journalist Mike Eghan, host of a popular Ghanaian talk show aired on the BBC (Mike Eghan at BBC Studios, London 1967 and Mike Eghan at Piccadilly Circus, London 1967). One image documents the visit of American boxing legend Muhammad Ali to London in 1966, showing Ali training in advance of a fight (Muhammad Ali Training, Earl’s Court, London 1966). A number of shots feature portraits of ‘cover girls’ that were originally published as covers for the magazine Drum, a publication originally from South Africa (Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London 1966, Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London 1966). In Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London the model poses at one of London’s most iconic sites; in Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London she stands in a London street, leaning against a car. These photographs capture the mood and fashion of London’s ‘swinging Sixties’, as well as the aspiration of Black immigrants to integrate into British society.

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Avinash Chandra, Hills of Gold  1964

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Anthony Lam, Two Boys during Eid, Spitafields, London  1994

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Anthony Lam, Untitled from the series Notes from the Street  1994

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Anthony Lam, Untitled from the series Notes from the Street  1994

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Faisal Abdu’Allah, I Wanna Kill Sam Cause He Ain’t My Motherfuckin’ Uncle  1993, printed 2010

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Raphael Albert, Holley posing at Blythe Road, London  c.1974, printed 2012

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Raphael Albert, Hammersmith, London  1970s, printed 2012

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Raphael Albert, Hammersmith, London  1960s, printed 2012

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Bandele ‘Tex’ Ajetunmobi, Couple Kissing, Whitechapel, London  c.1960s, printed 2012

This is one of a group of black and white photographs in Tate’s collection by Bandele Ajetunmobi – widely known as ‘Tex’ – in which he documented immigrant communities in the East End of London in the 1950s and 1960s, often focusing on the multi-racial nature of the area. The two photographs entitled Members’ Club, Whitechapel, London (Tate P14368 and P14370) date from the 1950s and are early documents of a multi-cultural London in the post-war years, at a time when a growing number of men and women were immigrating to Britain from the former colonies. They depict a musician and a mixed ethnicity couple in a club in the Whitechapel area, where many immigrants from the Caribbean settled. These types of venues were shaped by and for black people, but from the start were also frequented by white people. As the art historian Kobena Mercer has noted, in Britain ‘the nightlife surrounding black music was always a cross-cultural affair’ (Mercer 2012, p.15).

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James Barnor, Wedding Guests, London  1960s, printed 2010

This is one of a group of black and white and colour photographs in Tate’s collection taken by James Barnor in the 1960s (Tate P13419–P13421, P13484, P14381–P14384). Barnor’s portraiture played a key role in documenting black women and men who, in the post-war period, had immigrated to Britain from African countries and were establishing their identity as British. His photographs include images of unnamed subjects, such the two smartly-dressed women in Wedding Guests, London 1960s who pose in front of one of the classic British telephone boxes designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, presumably on their way to a wedding. Other portraits feature public figures, such as the radio journalist Mike Eghan, host of a popular Ghanaian talk show aired on the BBC (Mike Eghan at BBC Studios, London 1967 and Mike Eghan at Piccadilly Circus, London 1967). One image documents the visit of American boxing legend Muhammad Ali to London in 1966, showing Ali training in advance of a fight (Muhammad Ali Training, Earl’s Court, London 1966). A number of shots feature portraits of ‘cover girls’ that were originally published as covers for the magazine Drum, a publication originally from South Africa (Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London 1966, Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London 1966). In Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London the model poses at one of London’s most iconic sites; in Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London she stands in a London street, leaning against a car. These photographs capture the mood and fashion of London’s ‘swinging Sixties’, as well as the aspiration of Black immigrants to integrate into British society.

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James Barnor, Mike Eghan at the BBC Studios, London  1967, printed 2010

This is one of a group of black and white and colour photographs in Tate’s collection taken by James Barnor in the 1960s (Tate P13419–P13421, P13484, P14381–P14384). Barnor’s portraiture played a key role in documenting black women and men who, in the post-war period, had immigrated to Britain from African countries and were establishing their identity as British. His photographs include images of unnamed subjects, such the two smartly-dressed women in Wedding Guests, London 1960s who pose in front of one of the classic British telephone boxes designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, presumably on their way to a wedding. Other portraits feature public figures, such as the radio journalist Mike Eghan, host of a popular Ghanaian talk show aired on the BBC (Mike Eghan at BBC Studios, London 1967 and Mike Eghan at Piccadilly Circus, London 1967). One image documents the visit of American boxing legend Muhammad Ali to London in 1966, showing Ali training in advance of a fight (Muhammad Ali Training, Earl’s Court, London 1966). A number of shots feature portraits of ‘cover girls’ that were originally published as covers for the magazine Drum, a publication originally from South Africa (Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London 1966, Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London 1966). In Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London the model poses at one of London’s most iconic sites; in Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London she stands in a London street, leaning against a car. These photographs capture the mood and fashion of London’s ‘swinging Sixties’, as well as the aspiration of Black immigrants to integrate into British society.

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Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Abiku (Born to Die)  1988, printed c.1988

This is one of a group of four black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the larger series Abiku (Born to Die) 1988 (Tate P82469–P82472). In this series Fani Kayode has captured a black male model in different nude poses, his face deliberately turned away from the camera or obscured. In one, the model appears to the bottom left of the frame with only his upper chest visible and his head tilted backwards. His neck appears to be positioned between a pair of large, open scissors, yet their translucency makes it clear that this print is a double exposure: the two images were shot separately and the negatives were then exposed onto the same sheet of paper.

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Sorry, no image available

Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Abiku (Born to Die)  1988, printed c.1988

This is one of a group of four black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the larger series Abiku (Born to Die) 1988 (Tate P82469–P82472). In this series Fani Kayode has captured a black male model in different nude poses, his face deliberately turned away from the camera or obscured. In one, the model appears to the bottom left of the frame with only his upper chest visible and his head tilted backwards. His neck appears to be positioned between a pair of large, open scissors, yet their translucency makes it clear that this print is a double exposure: the two images were shot separately and the negatives were then exposed onto the same sheet of paper.

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artworks in Sixty Years: The Unfinished Conversation

Maud Sulter, Les Bijoux IX  2002

Les Bijoux 2002 is a series of photographs that comprises nine large-scale Polaroids of equal size that present a sequence of performative self-portraits by the British artist Maud Sulter. Adopting a similar posture in each image, the artist appears dressed in various lavish gowns and jewellery set against a black studio background. The works are numbered sequentially with Roman numerals, although they can be displayed separately and in any order. In seven of the images, Sulter looks directly at the camera while in two (numbers II, Tate P82548, and VIII, Tate P82554) she appears in profile. Her face presents a subtle array of dignified emotions, from desire to grief, and in two of the images (numbers III, Tate P82549, and VII, Tate P82553) she tugs at her necklace as if to break it. Made using a large-format Polaroid camera, the raw edges of the prints are left visible and the photographs’ white margins are muddied with residue from the Polaroid instant printing process.

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Ajamu, Body Builder in Bra  1990

Bodybuilder in Bra 1990 is a black and white photograph by the British photographer Ajamu. It exists in an edition of three, of which Tate’s copy is number three. It shows a close-up view of a muscular black back, the anonymous bodybuilder of the title. His arms are raised overhead and cropped at the triceps, and only the back of his neck and lower part of his head are shown. He wears a white bra that is tightly stretched around the core of his body, its straps twisted over his shoulders and its white fabric contrasting against his black skin. The raised arms suggest an action shot but the deep black background and deliberate studio lighting indicate otherwise. This image captures Ajamu’s distinctive approach to portraying gender and masculinity, while giving insight into the artist’s playful and spontaneous way of working. When asked about the photoshoot, Ajamu said: ‘we went to the local market here in Brixton, bought a bra and played around with it. This was one of the first shots.’ (Ajamu, conversation with Tate curator Mels Evers, 5 September 2019). This spontaneity is contrasted with the carefully balanced, painterly close-up of the black body. The intimate portrait of an unknown sitter invites the viewer to become a voyeur and in this way references the work of French surrealist photographer Pierre Molinier (1900–1976). In an interview for the catalogue of the exhibition Kiss My Genders at the Hayward Gallery, London in 2018, in which his work was included, Ajamu said:

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James Barnor, Mike Eghan at Picadilly Circus, London  1967, printed 2010

This is one of a group of black and white and colour photographs in Tate’s collection taken by James Barnor in the 1960s (Tate P13419–P13421, P13484, P14381–P14384). Barnor’s portraiture played a key role in documenting black women and men who, in the post-war period, had immigrated to Britain from African countries and were establishing their identity as British. His photographs include images of unnamed subjects, such the two smartly-dressed women in Wedding Guests, London 1960s who pose in front of one of the classic British telephone boxes designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, presumably on their way to a wedding. Other portraits feature public figures, such as the radio journalist Mike Eghan, host of a popular Ghanaian talk show aired on the BBC (Mike Eghan at BBC Studios, London 1967 and Mike Eghan at Piccadilly Circus, London 1967). One image documents the visit of American boxing legend Muhammad Ali to London in 1966, showing Ali training in advance of a fight (Muhammad Ali Training, Earl’s Court, London 1966). A number of shots feature portraits of ‘cover girls’ that were originally published as covers for the magazine Drum, a publication originally from South Africa (Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London 1966, Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London 1966). In Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck at Trafalgar Square, London the model poses at one of London’s most iconic sites; in Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London she stands in a London street, leaning against a car. These photographs capture the mood and fashion of London’s ‘swinging Sixties’, as well as the aspiration of Black immigrants to integrate into British society.

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artworks in Sixty Years: The Unfinished Conversation

Art in this room

Sorry, no image available

Rotimi Fani-Kayode Abiku (Born to Die) 1988, printed c.1988
P82548: Les Bijoux II
Maud Sulter Les Bijoux II 2002
P82553: Les Bijoux VII
Maud Sulter Les Bijoux VII 2002
P82630: Integer #3
Larry Achiampong Integer #3 2015
P82632: Glyth Series 2 #2
Larry Achiampong Glyth Series 2 #2 2018
T15143: Standing Figure with African Masks
Claudette Johnson Standing Figure with African Masks 2018

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