Claude Monet Water-Lilies after 1916

Room 9 in In the Studio

Claude Monet and Mark Rothko

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Art in Claude Monet and Mark Rothko

Water-Lilies

Courtesy National Gallery, London 2003. Photo:Tate

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Claude Monet
Water-Lilies
after 1916

In the 1890s, Monet developed a Japanese-style water-garden around the pond at his home in Giverny, north-west of Paris. The garden became an ‘outside studio’ for the artist, and the water-lilies floating on the surface of the pond became the principal motif of his later paintings. Filling the canvas, the pond becomes a world in itself, inspiring a sense of immersion in nature. At times verging on abstraction, the water-lily pictures are the culmination of Monet’s fascination with light and its changing effects on the natural environment.

Gallery label, November 2012

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Mark Rothko
UNTITLED (RED, BLACK, ORANGE & PINK ON YELLOW)
1954

Art in this room

Water-Lilies
Claude Monet Water-Lilies after 1916

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Mark Rothko UNTITLED (RED, BLACK, ORANGE & PINK ON YELLOW) 1954

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