Room 2: Perspectives and Diagonals

Nasreen Mohamedi, Untitled

Nasreen Mohamedi, Untitled
© Courtesy Chatterjee & Lal

In the late 1970s Mohamedi began working in a rectangular format, telling her friends that she was proud to have broken free of the grid. While continuing to work with the inked line using the same artistic process, these works begin to create three-dimensions within the paper, constructing almost architectural forms that seem to recede into infinity. While perspectivally accurate, the spaces created by Mohamedi’s lines are not restricted by physical laws and allow planes and structures to float above one another, hinting at a world of utopian design. 

These works relate to Mohamedi’s enthusiasm for Klee and Kandinsky who were both members of the Bauhaus, a 1920s institution which aimed to combine art and design in the belief that harmonious forms could create a better world through architecture, furniture design and textiles, as well as art. Mohamedi was very interested in design, as she indicated in diaries maintained throughout her life, and believed unity and function to be co-dependent. In some of the works from this period, the triangular form also returns, possibly signifying a connection to natural surroundings despite the stark abstraction of the drawings.