Cut and Paste

Make a pop art hat

Make your own bright and bold pop art hat!

The idea

Peter Blake, ‘Self-Portrait with Badges’ 1961
Peter Blake
Self-Portrait with Badges 1961
Tate
© Peter Blake 2017. All rights reserved, DACS

The pop art movement started in Britain in the 1950s. Pop artists wanted to make art part of everyday life. They were inspired by advertising, comic strips, pop music, celebrities and product packaging, so their work was very down-to-earth and something that everyone could enjoy. Pop art is bright, colourful and bold.

Can you work in a bright and exciting way to create your own pop art hat? Have a look at some of the work of the pop artists to get some inspiration first.

Be inspired by pop art

Get some ideas for your pop art hat. Check out the artwork below to explore some pop art in Tate's collection.

Peter Blake, ‘Tuesday’ 1961
Peter Blake
Tuesday 1961
Tate
© Peter Blake 2017. All rights reserved, DACS
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Explosion’ 1965–6
Roy Lichtenstein
Explosion 1965–6
Tate
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein
Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Whaam!’ 1963
Roy Lichtenstein
Whaam! 1963
Tate
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, ‘Real Gold’ 1949
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi
Real Gold 1949
Tate
© The Eduardo Paolozzi Foundation
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, ‘Meet the People’ 1948
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi
Meet the People 1948
Tate
© The estate of Eduardo Paolozzi
Richard Hamilton, ‘Towards a definitive statement on the coming trends in menswear and accessories (a)  Together let us explore the stars ’ 1962
Richard Hamilton
Towards a definitive statement on the coming trends in menswear and accessories (a) Together let us explore the stars 1962
Tate
© The estate of Richard Hamilton
Peter Blake, ‘On the Balcony’ 1955–7
Peter Blake
On the Balcony 1955–7
Tate
© Peter Blake 2017. All rights reserved, DACS
Patrick Caulfield, ‘Sweet Bowl’ 1967
Patrick Caulfield
Sweet Bowl 1967
Tate
© The estate of Patrick Caulfield. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2017
Peter Phillips, ‘The Entertainment Machine’ 1961
Peter Phillips
The Entertainment Machine 1961
Tate
© Peter Phillips
Pauline Boty, ‘The Only Blonde in the World’ 1963
Pauline Boty
The Only Blonde in the World 1963
Tate
© The estate of Pauline Boty

What you need

  • Materials for decorating the hat you design. You can use all sorts of packaging, old magazines, adverts, comic strips...
  • Glue or sticky tape
  • Ribbon or cord
  • Pipe cleaners

Do it!

  • Draw a rough design of the hat you want to make.
  • Collect the materials you will need.
  • Measure your head so you get the size of the hat right.
  • Make your hat, having as much fun as possible!

Top Tips!

  • Don’t be afraid to use ideas similar to those you have seen the pop artists use.
  • Be as imaginative as you like!
  • Use lots of bright colours, big writing and crazy pictures if you want to.
  • Make sure your hat means something special to you.

See it!

Pop art hats

Pop art hats made by kids at Tate © Tate

Kids making pop art hat

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