Art Term

Norwich school

Norwich school were an important British early nineteenth regional school of landscape painting

John Crome, ‘Yarmouth Harbour - Evening’ c.1817
John Crome
Yarmouth Harbour - Evening c.1817
Tate
John Sell Cotman, ‘Norwich Market-Place’ c.1809
John Sell Cotman
Norwich Market-Place c.1809
Tate
James Stark
Woody Landscape
Tate

The Norwich school formally dates from 1803 when, at his house in Norwich, John Crome and others formed the Norwich Society. It was initially a self-help discussion group for ‘an Enquiry into the Rise, Progress and present state of painting – with a view to point out the best methods of study to attain to Greater Perfection.’ In 1805 it became an exhibiting society and was joined by its other leading figure John Sell Cotman.

Paintings were in a low-key realist manner inspired by Norfolk landscape and the life of the Norfolk Broads and rivers. Other members of the school included the sons of Crome and Cotman, Joseph Stannard, James Stark and George Vincent. The best examples of the Norwich School works can be seen in the large collection at Norwich Castle Museum.

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