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Richard Tuttle's 'I Don't Know'

Artist Richard Tuttle takes on Tate Modern's Turbine Hall

Most people think colour is already a dead subject, but the artist on the other hand sees it as really the opposite, a complete inexhaustible subject.

In October 2014 Richard Tuttle unveiled his largest work to date in the vast space of the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern. A large white octagonal shape, cut from paper and glued against the white gallery wall ... It feels like the antithesis of painting.

Entitled I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language, the sculpture combines vast sways of fabrics designed by the artist from both man-made and natural fibres in bold and brilliant colours.

Transcription

I'm not an individual but I do like to be considered an individualist. I never sign my work for example. You make something in order not to have to sign it. It should be already a better signature than any signature you could possibly put on it.

This I find is quite a radical gesture. It's looking specifically at the perception of colour. Most people think colour is already a dead subject, but the artist on the other hand sees it as really the opposite, a complete inexhaustible subject. We don't know enough about perception or how it works and it's in that sense I'm looking at issues of perception that can be extrapolated onto questions of perception in general.

Important pieces will be shown at the Whitechapel. It is a body of work in which I have used a textile for more than 40 years. The publication shares the same structure, thesis into synthesis, and does in fact take you through the process of how this piece was made.

This room and this work are simultaneously arguing for the support of ambiguity because you just need to go out the doors and you enter a world that is constantly trying to crush the ambiguous in every way.

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