Henry Moore OM, CH Two Piece Reclining Figure No. 9 1968

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Artwork details

Artist
Title
Two Piece Reclining Figure No. 9
Date 1968
Medium Bronze
Dimensions Object: 1435 x 2438 x 1349 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition Presented by the artist 1978
Reference
T02301
Not on display

Catalogue entry

T02301 TWO PIECE RECLINING FIGURE NO.9 1968

Inscribed ‘Moore’ on base and stamped with foundry mark ‘H. NOACK BERLIN’ on side of base
Bronze, 56 1/2 × 96 × 53 1/8 including base (143.5 × 243.8 × 135)
Presented by the artist 1978
Exh: Henry Moore, Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo, May–July 1968, Museum Boymans-Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, September–November 1968 and Mathildenhöhe, Darmstadt, Spring 1969 (124, repr.); Henry Moore Bronzes 1961–1970, Marlborough Gallery, New York, April–May 1970 (28, repr. in colour); Henry Moore 1961–1971, Staatsgalerie Moderner Kunst, Munich, October–November 1971 (25, repr.); The Henry Moore Gift, Tate Gallery, June–August 1978, repr. in colour p. 60
Lit: Alan G. Wilkinson, The Moore Collection in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1979, p.201 (original plaster repr. pl.179)
Repr: Alan Bowness (ed.), Henry Moore Sculpture 1964–73, 1977, pl.82–5

L.H.576; there is an edition of seven bronzes and the original plaster is in the Moore Collection, Art Gallery of Ontario.

Alan Bowness has commented that in his recent two-piece reclining figures Moore is primarily interested in ‘the relationship between the two parts’ and that ‘the coming together of two or more parts of a sculpture is perhaps the essence of Moore's later work, both in form and subject.’ (op. cit., p.9). ‘Two-Piece Reclining Figure No.9’ is typical of Moore's later, more abstract style with its fairly generalised references to the human figure. It is also an example of his interest in forms which touch, interlock or rest one upon the other. (See the notes on T02300 and T02303). T02301 relates to earlier two-piece reclining figures such as ‘Two Piece No.2’ 1960 (L.H.458), a cast of which is in the Tate (T00395), and the Lincoln Center sculpture of 1963–5 (T02295), where the contrast between the upright torso section of the work and the horizontal leg part is clearly defined. In T02301 the top leg projects over the lower leg, which contributes to the suggestion of a dynamic, thrusting force.

Published in:
The Tate Gallery 1978-80: Illustrated Catalogue of Acquisitions, London 1981

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