Henry Moore OM, CH

Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe

1966, cast date unknown

Medium
Bronze
Dimensions
Object: 489 x 940 x 480 mm
integral base 50 x 940 x 480 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Presented by the artist 1978
Reference
T02300

Catalogue entry

Entry

Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe comprises two highly polished abstract forms positioned on a bronze base (fig.1). These elements are evenly sized but differently shaped and are made up of both angular and rounded forms. Although they are placed at a short distance from each other, the gap between them is bridged by a beam that extends out horizontally from one element and touches the other at a single point (fig.2).
Henry Moore 'Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe' 1966, cast date unknown
Fig.1
Henry Moore
Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe 1966, cast date unknown
Tate T02300
© The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved
Fig.2
Detail of interlocking parts of Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe 1966, cast date unknown
Tate T02300
© The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved

Seen from one side, the element with the extended beam is reminiscent of a smoking pipe – the arm may be understood as the long mouth-piece and the rounded form the tobacco barrel (fig.3) – which may explain the sculpture’s subtitle. This rounded element appears to have been constructed around a thin circular disk, from which bulbous forms extend on either side (fig.4).
Fig.3
Detail of Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe 1966, cast date unknown
Tate T02300
© The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved
Fig.4
Detail of Two Piece Sculpture No.7: Pipe 1966, cast date unknown (side view)
Tate T02300
© The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved

The other piece of the sculpture comprises one side that is almost completely flat and smooth except for a single raised point or nipple, located just to the right of centre (fig.5). Like the bulbous forms of the accompanying piece, two protrusions extend out from the other side of this flat, disk-like surface (fig.6). The larger of the protrusions creates a diagonal arc from the lower left to the top right. Towards the lower part of this element is a large concave extension, which rests on the base.

From plaster to bronze

Origins and interpretation

The Henry Moore Gift

Alice Correia
July 2013

Notes

1
Henry Moore cited in Gemma Levine, With Henry Moore: The Artist at Work, London 1978, p.123.
2
Henry Moore in ‘Henry Moore Talking to David Sylvester’, 7 June 1963, transcript of Third Programme, BBC Radio, broadcast 14 July 1963, p.18, Tate Archive TGA 200816. (An edited version of this interview was published in the Listener, 29 August 1963, pp.305–7.)
3
Henry Moore in ‘Interview: Conversation between Sir [sic] Henry Moore, Wolfgang Fischer and Erich Steingräber in Much Hadham on April 3, 1978’, in Erich Steingräber, Henry Moore Maquetten, Munich 1978, p.55.
4
Henry Moore cited in John Hedgecoe (ed.), Henry Moore, London 1968, p.300.
5
Alan Bowness (ed.), Henry Moore. Volume 4: Complete Sculpture 1964–73, London 1977, p.11.
6
Henry Moore, letter to Heinz Ohff, 8 March 1967, Henry Moore Foundation Archive.
7
David Jolley, ‘Henry Moore: Two-Piece Sculpture 1966, Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester’, Burlington Magazine, vol.109, no.774, September 1967, p.533.
8
Henry Moore, exhibition catalogue, Marlborough Fine Art, London 1966 (another cast reproduced no.19 as Two Piece Reclining Figure No.7).
9
Henry Moore, letter to Martin Butlin, 13 April 1961, Tate Artist Catalogue File, Henry Moore, A23945.
10
Bowness 1977, p.9.
11
Herbert Read, Henry Moore: Sculptor, London 1934, p.12.
12
Henry Moore, ‘Statement for Unit One’, in Herbert Read (ed.), Unit One: The Modern Movement in English Architecture, Painting and Sculpture, London 1934, pp.29–30, reprinted in Alan Wilkinson (ed.), Henry Moore: Writings and Conversations, Aldershot 2002, p.192.
13
Henry Moore cited in Albert Elsen, ‘Henry Moore’s Reflections on Sculpture’, Art Journal, vol.26, no.4, Summer 1967, p.355.
14
Christa Lichtenstern, Henry Moore: Work-Theory-Impact, London 2008, p.241.
15
Bowness 1977, p.9.
16
Moore in Hedgecoe 1968, p.504.
17
Moore, ‘Statement for Unit One’, reprinted in Wilkinson 2002, p.191.
18
Ibid., p.191.
19
David Sylvester, Henry Moore, exhibition catalogue, Tate Gallery, London 1968, p.53.
20
Jennifer Mundy, ‘Comment on England’, in Chris Stephens (ed.), Henry Moore, exhibition catalogue, Tate Britain, London 2010, p.28.
21
Ibid., p.28.
22
Alan G. Wilkinson, Henry Moore Remembered: The Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Toronto 1987, p.220.
23
Bowness 1977, p.9.
24
Sylvester 1968, p.93.
25
Moore, letter to Martin Butlin, 13 April 1961, Tate Artist Catalogue File, Henry Moore, A23945.
26
Sylvester 1968, p.93.
27
Berthoud 2003, pp.366–7.
28
Wilkinson 1987, p.220.
29
Henry Moore cited in Albert Elsen, ‘The New Freedom of Henry Moore’, Art International,vol.11, no.7, September 1967, p.43 (original italics).
30
Robert Melville, Henry Moore: Sculpture and Drawings 1921–69, London 1970, p.301.
31
Helen Morales, Classical Mythology: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford 2007, unpaginated.
32
See ‘Note on the Henry Moore Gift’, 1978, Tate Public Records TG 4/6/10/4.
33
These figures are based on those listed in a memo in the exhibition’s records. See Tate Public Records TG 92/344/2.
34
Norman Reid, letter to Mary Danowski, 31 August 1978, Tate Public Records TG 4/6/10/4.

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