Henry Moore OM, CH Two Piece Sculpture No. 7: Pipe 1966

Catalogue entry

T02300 TWO PIECE SCULPTURE NO.7: PIPE 1966

Inscribed ‘Moore 0/0’ on base
Bronze, 17 × 33 × 12 3/8 (43.2 × 83.9 × 31.5)
Presented by the artist 1978
Exh: Henry Moore, Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo, May–July 1968, Museum Boymans-Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, September–November 1968 and Mathildenhöhe, Darmstadt, Spring 1969 (118, repr.); Henry Moore, Arts Council, Tate Gallery, July–September 1968 (136, repr.); Henry Moore, University of York Visual Arts Society, Heslington Hall, March 1969 (39); Henry Moore Drawings and Sculpture, Arts Council, Supplementary Works lent by Henry Moore, Gordon Maynard Gallery, Welwyn Garden City, July 1969 (H.M.8); Henry Moore Bronzes 1961–1970, Marlborough Gallery, New York, April–May 1970 (25, repr. in colour); Henry Moore, Musée Rodin, Paris, 1971 (49, repr.); Mostra di Henry Moore, Forte di Belvedere, Florence, May–September 1972 (141, repr.); Henry Moore, Expo Zürich, Zürcher Forum, Zurich, June–August 1976 (82); The Henry Moore Gift, Tate Gallery, June–August 1978, repr. p.58
Lit: John Russell, Henry Moore, 1968, p.193 (repr. pl.198); John Hedgecoe and Henry Moore, Henry Moore, 1968, p.504 (repr. and in colour p.442); David Sylvester in catalogue of Henry Moore, Tate Gallery, 1968, pp.38, 141 (repr. pls.29, 133); Alan G. Wilkinson, The Moore Collection in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1979, p.195 (original plaster repr. pl.171)
Repr: Giulio Carlo Argan, Henry Moore, Milan 1971, pl.197 in colour; Alan Bowness (ed.), Henry Moore Sculpture 1964–73, 1977, pls.38, 39

This is no.543 in Lund Humphries. There is an edition of nine bronzes and the original plaster is in the Moore Collection, Art Gallery of Ontario. The Tate's cast was the artist's own, making ten in all.

As with the two ‘Three Way Piece’ sculptures (T02298 and T02299), ‘Pipe’ is, in Moore's own words, ‘an attempt to make a sculpture which is varied in all its views and forms.’ (Hedgecoe, op. cit.). The main difference is that ‘Pipe’ is a work in two pieces, the seventh in the series which began in 1959 with ‘Two Piece Reclining Figure No.1’, and as such it offers, in common with all Moore's broken figures, an even greater variety of viewpoints. In ‘Pipe’, however, Moore has omitted the descriptive term ‘reclining figure’ from the title. The figurative references are kept to a minimum, although commentators have recognised a sexual element in the way the pipe stem seems to penetrate the second ‘female’ form. The two pieces actually touch and the sense of fitting together is strong.

Alan Bowness observes that the figure/landscape analogy in such works as T02300, with their highly polished bronze surfaces, is less explicit and that ‘the obvious metaphor is between figure and bone.’ (op. cit., p.9).

Published in:
The Tate Gallery 1978-80: Illustrated Catalogue of Acquisitions, London 1981

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