Joseph Mallord William Turner

Mars and Venus, after Guercino

1802

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Medium
Graphite on paper
Dimensions
Support: 128 x 114 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Reference
D04319
Turner Bequest LXXII 35

Catalogue entry

Guercino’s (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, called Il Guercino 1591–1666) picture – attributed to Domenichino by Turner in his commentary begun on folio 36 of this sketchbook (D04320) – had been taken from the collection of the ducal Este family in Modena in 1796. It was returned in 1815 (Galleria Estense, Modena). Turner also copied Guercino’s Virgin and Child, perhaps then attributed to Ercole Gennari – see folio 37 (D04322) – and his Raising of Lazarus under the impression it was by Domenichino; see folio 53 (D04342). For his copies of Domenichino’s Hercules and Cacus and Combat of Hercules and Achelous, see folios 76, 77 (D04372, D04374).
In respect of Turner’s misattribution of the present picture, Guillaume Faroult has confirmed to Ian Warrell that the Louvre’s official catalogue in 1802 left a slight doubt as to its authorship.1
1
Warrell in David Solkin ed., Turner and the Masters, exhibition catalogue, Tate Britain, London 2009, pp.44, 225 note 15.
Verso:
Blank

David Blayney Brown
October 2009

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