Marta Minujín in La menesunda (Mayhem) 1965
Marta Minujín in La menesunda (Mayhem) 1965
Centro de Artes Visuales, Instituto Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires

This issue explores two distinct themes: the internationalism of pop art in the 1960s and 1970s and the writings of the nineteenth-century critic William Hazlitt. Works by pop artists from Argentina, Brazil, France and Yugoslavia are examined in relation to local and global contexts, while Hazlitt’s aesthetic theories, rhetorical devices and literary influences are analysed through close readings of individual texts. Complementing the papers on pop art is an article investigating the wax effigies created by American artists Paul Thek and Lynn Hershman Leeson.

Contents

GLOBAL POP

GLOBAL POP
Liam Considine

Examining the technical and symbolic impact of pop art on the posters produced at the Atelier Populaire during the events of May 1968 in France, this paper highlights the use of pictorial devices associated with pop, such as the opaque projector and silkscreen, and explores the crossover between the production of the Atelier and the work of French artists including Bernard Rancillac, Guy de Rougemont and Gilles Aillaud.

GLOBAL POP
Branislav Dimitrijević

The early work of Dušan Otašević constitutes a rare example of the influence of Anglo-American pop on an eastern European artist working under the conditions of 1960s socialism. In this paper Branislav Dimitrijević argues that Otašević did not uncritically appropriate stylistic models imported from the West, but explored the specific and complex relationship between production and consumption under socialism.

GLOBAL POP
Sofia Gotti

This article provides an overview of the work produced by Brazilian artist Teresinha Soares in the late 1960s and early 1970s and examines the various terms that have been used to describe and define it. With respect to the specificity of Soares’s work the article proposes that the adjective ‘Pantagruelian’ can be annexed to ‘pop’ to reveal its rootedness in popular traditions and folklore in Brazil.

GLOBAL POP
Catherine Spencer

The June 1966 issue of Arts Magazine heralded the Argentine artist Marta Minujín’s arrival on the international art scene as a ‘Latin Answer to Pop’. This article seeks to complicate Minujín’s affiliation with pop art, arguing that she performed this identification strategically, playing pop aesthetics off against happenings and nouveau réalisme in a way that prompts comparison with the works of her Argentine contemporaries.

WILLIAM HAZLITT

WILLIAM HAZLITT
Susanna Avery-Quash

Hazlitt’s account of the Angerstein Collection was published anonymously in 1822, two years before Lord Liverpool purchased thirty-eight pictures from it to form the nucleus of the National Gallery. This paper considers Hazlitt’s essay within the wider context of writing about art collections in the early nineteenth century, which was then a new and developing field, and compares it with other publications on Angerstein’s pictures to highlight the distinctive qualities of Hazlitt’s art criticism. 

WILLIAM HAZLITT
Luisa Calè

This essay explores the associations made by William Hazlitt between the work of the Elizabethan poet Edmund Spenser and paintings by Rubens, Titian and Poussin, revealing how the nineteenth-century critic drew upon Spenser’s writing to conjure the notion of ‘a gallery in the mind’: a virtual collection of pictures encountered through words that served the new public for temporary exhibitions of Old Master paintings.

WILLIAM HAZLITT
Paul Hamilton

For William Hazlitt paintings become politically charged when their self-contained worlds make us aware of our creative potential for renewing our own. This essay examines the contradictions between Hazlitt’s radical politics and his opposition to the mass appreciation of art, compares his writings on aesthetic experience to those of his contemporary Karl Marx, and unpacks the critic’s enigmatic thoughts on J.M.W. Turner and the possibilities of painting.

WILLIAM HAZLITT
Paul Tucker

Adapting and applying speech act theories of language use, this paper offers a new understanding of the innovative import of William Hazlitt’s art criticism. Textual and rhetorical analysis of a sample of his critical writing – the 1821 essay ‘On a Landscape of Nicolas Poussin’ – illustrates Hazlitt’s development of ‘characterisation’, a mode of representation of the individual artwork focusing on its perceptual and affective appeal to a responsive viewer.

Milena Tomic

In the late 1960s and early 1970s American artists Paul Thek and Lynn Hershman Leeson independently created wax effigies and situated them within immersive or performative contexts that transformed the visual language of sovereignty and dignified the socially marginal body. This paper explores lost installations by both artists, where the effigy’s connotations of volatility challenged biopolitical systems of control as well as the reduction of individuals to stereotypes.