Malevich exhibition web banner
Malevich
Tate Modern: Exhibition
16 July 26 October 2014

The Eyal Ofer Galleries, Level 3
Adult £14.50 (without donation £13.10)
Concession £12.50 (without donation £11.30)
Help Tate by including the voluntary donation to enable Gift Aid
Additional booking fee of £1.75 (£2 via telephone) per transaction applies
Under 12s go free (up to four per parent or guardian)

1 of 5
  • Kazimir Malevich Black Square 1913

    Kazimir Malevich
    Black Square 1913  

     
    © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

  • Kazimir Malevich Suprematism 1915

    Kazimir Malevich
    Suprematism 1915 

    © State Russian Museum, St Petersburg

  • Kasimir Malevich, 'Dynamic Suprematism' 1915 or 1916

    Kazimir Malevich
    Dynamic Suprematism 1915 or 1916
    Oil on canvas
    support: 803 x 800 mm frame: 1015 x 1015 x 80 mm
    Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1978

    View the main page for this artwork

  • Kazimir Malevich Self Portrait 1908-1910

    Kazimir Malevich 
    Self Portrait 1908-1910

    © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

  • Kazimir Malevich  Shroud of Christ 1908

    Kazimir Malevich
    Shroud of Christ 1908

    © State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Kazimir Malevich, an artist as influential as he was radical, cast a long shadow over the history of modern art. This, his first retrospective in thirty years and the first ever in the UK, unites works from collections in Russia, the US and Europe to tell a fascinating story of revolutionary ideals and the power of art itself.

Malevich (1879–1935) lived and worked through one of the most turbulent periods in twentieth century history. Having come of age in Tsarist Russia, Malevich witnessed the First World War and the October Revolution first-hand.

His early experiments as a painter led him towards the invention of suprematism, a bold visual language of abstract geometric shapes and stark colours, epitomised by the Black Square. One of the defining works of Modernism, the painting was revealed to the world after months of secrecy and was hidden again for almost half a century after its creator’s death. It sits on a par with Duchamp’s ‘readymade’ as a game-changing moment in twentieth century art and continues to inspire and confound viewers to this day.

Starting from his early paintings of Russian landscapes, agricultural workers and religious scenes, the exhibition follows Malevich’s journey towards abstract painting and his suprematist masterpieces, his temporary abandonment of painting in favour of teaching and writing, and his much-debated return to figurative painting in later life.



Bringing together paintings, sculptures, theatre and an unprecedented collection of drawings it offers a complete view of his career, celebrating some of the most progressive art ever made.

With generous loans from the Khardzhiev Collection, Amsterdam and the Costakis Collection, SMCA-Thessaloniki.

The exhibition is organised by Tate Modern, in collaboration with the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam and Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany, Bonn.

‘Once in a lifetime’ is an overused description but it really applies here… Unmissable.
Time Out *****

Each painting unleashes itself like a firework.
The Observer

The two rooms filled with what Malevich christened suprematism are two of the most exciting spaces I have walked into at Tate Modern.
The Sunday Times

*****
The Times

*****
Evening Standard

Here’s the show I’ve always wanted to see
Waldemar Januszczak, The Sunday Times

Banner image credits: Kazimir Malevich Supremus No. 55 1916 © F. A. Kovalenko Regional Art Museum of Krasnodar (Krasnodar, Russia) c / o ROSIZO