Leonard Appelbee

Landscape, Meadle

1939

Artist
Leonard Appelbee 1914–2000
Medium
Oil paint on canvas
Dimensions
Support: 457 x 660 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Presented by the Trustees of the Chantrey Bequest 1940
Reference
N05342

Not on display

Display caption

Leonard Appelbee defined himself proudly as a traditionalist. Determinedly ignoring the move towards abstraction, he maintained a love of traditional subject matter and technique, as demonstrated in this early painting of a group of outhouses near the Buckinghamshire village of Meadle. As his career progressed he became increasingly disillusioned with the growing commercialism of the art world. Looking back he explained that he had not been motivated by a desire for fame or financial reward. '' I painted,'' he said, '' because I felt that one day someone may feel better for seeing what I do.''

Gallery label, August 2004

Catalogue entry

N05342 LANDSCAPE, MEADLE 1939
 
Inscr. ‘Leonard Appelbee 39’ b.r.
Canvas, 18×26 (45×66).
Chantrey Purchase from the artist 1940.
Exh: C.A.S., British Painting Today, Bath, May–June 1940 (42); R.A., 1944 (14).

A group of outhouses painted near the Buckinghamshire village of Meadle, which is situated some three miles north of Princes Risborough.

Published in:
Mary Chamot, Dennis Farr and Martin Butlin, The Modern British Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture, London 1964, I

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