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Roni Horn's work is a continuation of some of the formal arguments of American Minimal art. Her concentrated, simple forms and the conception of sculpture aligned to a specific space echo such artists as Judd and Andre. However, the artist's use of language and metaphor distinguishes her work and emphasises a connection with the structures of poetry. Here, Horn uses a pair of polished aluminium rectangles and bright yellow plastic to make tangible William Blake's 'Tyger Tyger burning bright' from 'Songs of Innocence and Experience'. The poem reflects on the breadth of the act of creation and marvels at the awesome inspiration of the creator: 'What immortal hand or eye/Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?'

August 2004