Catalogue entry

T02292 THREE PIECE RECLINING FIGURE NO.2: BRIDGE PROP 1963

Inscribed ‘Moore 0/6’ and ‘H. NOACK BERLIN’ on central foot
Bronze, 41 1/2 × 95 1/8 × 43 3/8 (104.9 × 241.7 × 110.3)
Presented by the artist 1978
Exh: Henry Moore, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, October–November 1967 and tour to Charlottetown (Prince Edward Island) and St Johns (Newfoundland), ending up at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottowa, June–September 1968 (20, repr.); Henry Moore Exhibition in Japan, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, August–October, 1969 (58, repr.); Henry Moore 1961–1971, Staatsgalerie Moderner Kunst, Munich, October–November 1971 (5, repr.); Mostra di Henry Moore, Forte di Belvedere, Florence, May–September 1972 (127, repr.); Henry Moore - Fem Decennier Skulptur, teckning, grafik 1923–1975, Heni Onstad Kunstsenter, Oslo, June–July 1975 and tour to Stockholm and Ålborg (67); Henry Moore, Expo Zürich, Zürcher Forum, Zurich, June–August 1976 (73, repr.); Henry Moore Sculptures et Dessins, Orangerie des Tuileries, Paris, May–August 1977, (102, repr.); The Henry Moore Gift, Tate Gallery, June–August 1978, repr. in colour p.51
Lit: Herbert Read, Henry Moore, 1965, pp.232–4 (repr. in colour pl.219 and on dustjacket); John Russell, Henry Moore, 1968, pp.187–191 (repr. pl.195); John Hedgecoe and Henry Moore, Henry Moore, 1968, p.404 (repr.); David Sylvester, catalogue of Henry Moore, Tate Gallery, 1968, p.141 (repr. pl.132); Alan G. Wilkinson, The Moore Collection in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1979, p.180 (original plaster repr. pl.162)
Repr: Alan Bowness (ed.), Henry Moore Sculpture and Drawings 1955–64, 1965, pl.163–6

L.H. 513. There are six casts plus one, the artist's, which is now the Tate's. The original plaster is in the Moore Collection, Art Gallery of Ontario. Wilkinson notes that the ‘landscape images’ of earlier two and three-piece reclining figures have given way, in T02292, to ‘the functional forms of engineering’ (op. cit.), though an analogy with bone forms would be just as appropriate. Moore said that he was reminded of the view under Waterloo Bridge when working on the sculpture: ‘The arches, seen from the Embankment, are strong’ (Hedgecoe, op. cit.). See also the note on T02289 for Moore's remarks on the three-piece reclining figure.

Published in:
The Tate Gallery 1978-80: Illustrated Catalogue of Acquisitions, London 1981