William Shackleton

The Mackerel Nets

1912–3

Medium
Oil paint on canvas
Dimensions
Support: 1022 x 1168 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Presented by Professor Frederick Brown 1923
Reference
N03820

Display caption

Shackleton was an idiosyncratic artist. He had studied in Paris in the 1890s, and developed an individual kind of Symbolism in his paintings of groups of nudes. He was devoted to the art of Turner, and borrowed from some of his paintings the unusual grey and pink colouring of many of his own. This beach scene by twilight was sketched by Shackleton near Boulogne. He worked very slowly, and made numerous studies in oil, pastel and gouache.

Gallery label, September 2004

Catalogue entry

N03820 THE MACKEREL NETS 1913

Inscr. ‘Wm. Shackleton 13’ b.l.
Canvas, 40 1/4×46 (102×117).
Presented by Professor Fred Brown 1923.
Coll: Presumably purchased by Professor Brown from the artist.
Exh: N.E.A.C., winter 1913 (6); Leicester Galleries, February–March 1922 (17), lent by the artist and not sold at the exhibition.
Repr: Studio, LXXXIII, 1922, p.20; Artwork, III, 1927, p.157.

[no further details]

Published in:
Mary Chamot, Dennis Farr and Martin Butlin, The Modern British Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture, London 1964, II