Edward Wadsworth

Granite Quarries, Darby Hill, Oldbury

1919

Medium
Ink on paper
Dimensions
Support: 254 x 362 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Purchased 1951
Reference
N05988

Display caption

After the first world war Wadsworth made a number of drawings of industrial landscapes. They represent a key phase in his development. Like his earlier Vorticist work they are concerned with regular forms reduced to simple planes. But they also show him attempting to forge a more realistic and unidealised vision of the modern world in the aftermath of war. Appropriately, they focus on the waste products of industrialisation, in particular quarries and slag heaps.

Gallery label, July 2008

Catalogue entry

N05988 GRANITE QUARRIES, DARBY HILL, OLDBURY 1919

Inscr. ‘Edward Wadsworth 1919’ b.l. and ‘Granite Quarries, Darby Hill, Oldbury’ on verso.
Pen and ink, 10×14 1/4 (25·5×36·25).
Purchased from Mrs Wadsworth (Knapping Fund) 1951.
Exh: Tate Gallery, February–March 1951 (64).

This was one of a number of drawings executed during 1919–20 when the artist was collecting material for his book The Black Country, published by the Ovid Press, London, in 1920. It was probably done during the time Wadsworth was staying with Sir Barry Jackson in Birmingham.

Published in:
Mary Chamot, Dennis Farr and Martin Butlin, The Modern British Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture, London 1964, II