Now Booking Tate Liverpool Exhibition

LIFE IN MOTION: EGON SCHIELE/ FRANCESCA WOODMAN

Egon Schiele, Standing male figure (self-portrait) 1914. Photograph © National Gallery in Prague 2017


Egon Schiele and Francesca Woodman are paired together in this new exhibition exploring motion in drawing and photography

Francesca Woodman, ‘Eel Series, Roma, May 1977 - August 1978’ 1977–8
Francesca Woodman
Eel Series, Roma, May 1977 - August 1978 1977–8
Tate / National Galleries of Scotland
© Courtesy of George and Betty Woodman

10 years on from acclaimed exhibition Gustav Klimt, Tate Liverpool showcases the works of his protégé, radical Austrian expressionist Egon Schiele (1890–1918) alongside the work of American photographer Francesca Woodman (1958 – 1981). Renowned for their nude portraits and self-portraits, Schiele and Woodman lay bare their subject’s emotional state in intimate work.

A champion of Austrian expressionism, Schiele had a distinctive style using quick marks and sharp lines to capture the animated energy of his models.  Francesca Woodman was one of the most innovative photographers of the 20th century. She employed long exposures to create blurred images that captured extended moments in time.  Her photographs are striking, surreal and often humorous.

Woodman’s photographs highlight how Schiele’s practices and ideas continue to have a relevance to contemporary art in an exhibition that offers the viewer a close encounter with these personal and powerful works.

Tate Liverpool

Albert Dock
Liverpool Waterfront
Liverpool L3 4BB
Plan your visit

Dates

24 May – 23 September 2018

Pricing

£12.50 FREE for Members

Adult £12.50
Concession £10.50
Student £6 

Help Tate by including a voluntary donation and enabling Gift Aid during your ticket purchase

Under 12s go free (up to four under 12s per parent or guardian)

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